Pfizer’s chief executive says company will ask for approval of its Covid vaccine for children aged 5-11 ‘in days’ 

- Advertisement -


  • Pfizer Inc. CEO Albert Boerla appeared on ABC’s This Week on Sunday
  • He said the company will submit its application for FDA approval of its COVID vaccine in children aged 5-11 years “in days”.
  • Pfizer said recently released data showed the vaccine induced a ‘strong’ immune response in young children
  • Children aged 5-11 will receive a smaller dose at 10 micrograms (μg) 21 days apart, compared to a 30 microgram dose for children 12 and older
  • Parents are split 50/50 on whether or not to vaccinate their children as children make up less than 0.1% of all COVID deaths in the US

- Advertisement -

Pfizer CEO says the company plans to get the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorization for its COVID-19 vaccine in young children ‘in a few days’.

On Sunday, ABC’s . in an appearance on This week, Albert Boerla was asked when the country should expect the shots to be approved in children between the ages of five and 11.

advertisement

The New York-based firm, along with its German partner BioNTech, recently released data showing that the vaccine was safe and effective in small doses in primary school children.

Borla told host Jorge Stephanopoulos, ‘I think we’re going to have this data very quickly.

- Advertisement -

‘It’s a question of days, not weeks, and then it’s up to the FDA to review the data and come to its conclusion and whether or not to approve it.’

Pfizer Inc CEO Albert Boerla told ABC’s This Week on Sunday (above) that the company will submit its application for FDA approval of its COVID vaccine in children aged 5-11 in “days.”

According to Pfizer, recently released data showed that the vaccine induced a 'strong' immune response in young children.  Pictured: Dr. Erin Biro holds her son as he receives a shot at Pfizer's clinical trial in young children

According to Pfizer, recently released data showed that the vaccine induced a ‘strong’ immune response in young children. Pictured: Dr. Erin Biro holds her son as he receives a shot at Pfizer’s clinical trial in young children

According to clinicaltrials.govPfizer’s study in younger children worked the same way as in older children and adults.

A total of 4,500 young children aged six months to 11 years were enrolled at nearly 100 clinical trial sites in 26 US states, Finland, Poland and Spain.

About half of those aged five to 11 were given two doses 21 days apart and the other half were given placebo shots.

The team then tested the safety, tolerability and immune response generated by the vaccine by measuring antibody levels in young subjects.

Pfizer said it has selected a lower dose for COVID-19 vaccine trials in children than in adolescents and adults.

People 12 years of age and older get two 30 microgram (μg) doses of the vaccine.

However, children aged five to 11 years were given a 10 microgram dose and children aged six months to four years would be given a three microgram dose.

Borla assured that if the FDA authorizes the shot in young children, Pfizer would be ready to ship these smaller doses nationwide.

“If they approve it, we’ll be ready with our build to make this new formulation of the vaccine available,” he told this week.

‘Because the vaccine that children will get… is a different formulation. This is one third of the dose that we are giving to the rest of the population.

Unlike the larger clinical trial conducted in adults, the pediatric trial did not measure efficacy by comparing the number of COVID-19 cases among the vaccine group to the number of placebo groups.

Instead, the scientists looked at the levels of neutralizing antibodies in young vaccine recipients and compared the levels to those seen in adults.

The companies expect data on how well the vaccine works in children aged two to five years and those between six months and two years of age by the end of the year.

More recently, pediatric cases also rose from 71,726 per week in early August to more than 243,000 earlier this month, fueled by the Delta version.

However, according to a, they now seem to be trending downwards last week with 225,000American Academy of Pediatrics.

There have also been 480 pediatric deaths since the start of the pandemic, indicating that children account for less than 0.1 percent of all deaths.

Currently, no evidence suggests that the delta variant is more dangerous in children than previous strains of the virus.

Because of this low risk of serious illness, surveys have shown that many parents are unwilling to vaccinate their children.

A survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation noted that 19% of parents of children aged five to 11 said they only plan to vaccinate their children if their school requires it. and another 19% said their child would definitely not be vaccinated.

A survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation noted that 19% of parents of children aged five to 11 said they only plan to vaccinate their children if their school requires it. and another 19% said their child would definitely not be vaccinated.

in April 2021 voteRun by the Kaiser Family Foundation, parents were asked whether they would vaccinate their child once a COVID-19 vaccine was authorized and available for their child’s age group.

Of parents between the ages of five and 11, 27 percent said they would get their child vaccinated ‘immediately’ and 32 percent said they would wait and see how it worked.

Nineteen percent said they only plan to vaccinate their children if their school requires it and an additional 19 percent said their child will definitely not be vaccinated.

1 July 2021 SurveySimilar results were found, conducted by the CS Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at Michigan Medicine.

Of the parents of three to 11-year-olds, 49 percent said their children were likely to get the vaccine and 51 percent said it was unlikely.

.

- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories