Prince Philip’s study, exactly as he left it: Duke’s neat and tidy private Buckingham Palace office filled with a wedding gift from George VI, a statuette of the Queen and carriage driving mementoes is glimpsed in BBC tribute

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  • BBC’s Prince Philip: The Royal Family Remembers gives a glimpse of the late royal’s no-frills private study
  • The film was originally conceived to mark the Duke’s 100th birthday in June, but he died two months before the anniversary.
  • It includes photographs of the Queen’s parents George VI and Elizabeth, which were gifted to the couple on their wedding day in 1947
  • Underrated studies include television screens and equestrian sculptures in tribute to the Duke’s love of equestrian

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An upcoming documentary on the life of Prince Philip gives a rare glimpse inside the Duke’s private study at Buckingham Palace, which remains exactly as he left before his death.

The Duke of Edinburgh, who died in April at the age of 99, conducted his affairs from a private office attached to the office of his personal secretary.

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In the BBC documentary Prince Philip: The Royal Family Remembers, airing tomorrow at 9pm, staff members and senior royals pay tribute to the Duke and give an insight into his private quarters.

A glimpse inside their study revealed portraits of Her Majesty’s parents George VI and Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother, which were gifted to the couple on their wedding day in November 1947, as well as a watch from the Royal Collection Was too.

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Prince Philip also adorned his study with tributes to his love of horse riding and horses, including an equestrian statue on the window and statues of himself and the emperor playing polo and riding at Trooping the Colour, respectively.

Meanwhile, in his personal secretary’s office, the Duke holds gifts from his travels around the world and a portrait of Philip during his favorite pass time, a carriage driving marathon, hangs on the wall.

the study

An upcoming documentary on the life of Prince Philip gives a rare glimpse inside Buckingham Palace to capture the Duke’s private study exactly as it was during his seven decades of public service. Image: 1) Equestrian Statue; 2) Collection of Sculptures’ 3) Clock from the Royal Collection; 4) television screen; 5) photographs of George VI and Queen Elizabeth; 6) Statue of the Queen on a Horse at Trooping the Color

1) Equestrian sculpture

At various times throughout his life Prince Philip would be pictured cruising on his beloved driving carriage through the grounds of Windsor, so it should come as no surprise that he has an equestrian-themed statue sitting by his window

At various times throughout his life Prince Philip would be pictured cruising on his beloved driving carriage through the grounds of Windsor, so it should come as no surprise that he has an equestrian-themed statue sitting by his window

At various times throughout his life Prince Philip would be pictured cruising on his beloved driving carriage through the grounds of Windsor, so it should come as no surprise that he has an equestrian-themed statue sitting by his window.

Carriage driving would give the Duke of Edinburgh both a hobby to enjoy with family and friends and a sport to focus on his competitive spirit.

Duke spent 22 years as a respected president of the International Equestrian Federation (FEI), the world governing body for everything from dressage to showjumping.

He began carriage-driving in his fifties in 1971, switching from polo due to an arthritic wrist. Philip would compete regularly – even helping Britain win the World Championships in the 1980s at the grounds of Windsor.

Duke was credited with shaping the sport in the UK and was still competing in his eighties, representing Britain at three European Championships and a total of six World Championships.

Prince Philip spoke of his love of traveling through the countryside in his horse-drawn carriages, whip in hand, at high speed. In a book he wrote about the sport, he said: ‘I am getting old, my reactions are slowing, and my memory is unbelievable, but I have never lost the joy of driving a team through the British countryside. .

2) Collection of sculptures

In typical humorous fashion, the Duke had large statues of politicians and other high-profile figures, some of whom appear to be members of the royal family with large heads.

In typical humorous fashion, the Duke had large statues of politicians and other high-profile figures, some of whom appear to be members of the royal family with large heads.

In typical humorous fashion, the Duke had large statues of politicians and other high-profile figures, some of whom appear to be members of the royal family with large heads.

The Duke was known for his cheeky sense of humour, and in his 70 years of public duty always brought a sense of fun to the public, foreign dignitaries and their own family members laughing during outings.

Even as his health deteriorated, His Royal Highness never lost his sense of humor and was often depicted with his wife, children and grandchildren pulling very expressive faces and laughing and joking. was done.

In a BBC documentary, William reveals how the Duke of Edinburgh tells his grandchildren to hold a tube of mustard in their hands and then remove the lid when they are BBQ-ing at Balmoral.

“He used to get into a lot of trouble with my grandmother for covering most of the places where we used to have lunch with mustard on the terrace,” he said.

3) 19th century French clock

On the Duke's desk is a Faberge watch from the Royal Collection made by Johann Victor Arne, one of the famous 19th-century Finnish jewelers, from 1896 - 1908.

On the Duke’s desk is a Faberge watch from the Royal Collection made by Johann Victor Arne, one of the famous 19th-century Finnish jewelers, from 1896 – 1908.

On the Duke’s desk is a Faberge watch from the Royal Collection made by Johann Victor Arne, one of the famous 19th-century Finnish jewelers, from 1896 – 1908.

The watch is made from enamel and silver with silver decoration applied in the form of a bow from which the dial is suspended. 12 hours are represented in Arabic numerals. Like most of Fabergé’s watches, the dial is plain white with clear numerals.

In addition to patronizing British artists, Prince Philip took an active interest in preserving and exhibiting the royal collection.

He was the initiator of the original Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace, which opened in 1962, and consulted on the design of the current Queen’s Gallery, which opened in 2002. He chaired the restoration committee after the 1992 fire at Windsor Castle.

4) television screen

A small television screen is also present in Duke's study.  It was said that Philip was the initial driving force in pushing the monarchy into the modern era by embracing television and modern media.

A small television screen is also present in Duke’s study. It was said that Philip…

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