Riding posture of electric scooter users increases the risk of head or brain injuries during accidents and collisions, online ‘fail’ videos reveal 

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  • Experts say the way electric scooter riders stand can affect head or brain injuries
  • Study a reconstructed series of typical accident scenarios through computational methods
  • The rider’s falling posture has a different effect on head and/or brain injury
  • Riders ‘will benefit from arm, shoulder and chest cushioning’ – study

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A new study suggests that the driving posture of electric scooter riders may increase the risk of head or brain injuries during accidents and collisions.

Chinese researchers recreated a series of specific accident scenarios through computational methods to investigate how cranial injuries were affected by collisions with fixed obstacles or falls from mechanical failure.

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He said similar injuries occurred in both the single- and two-wheeled electric scooters, but the rider’s falling posture had a different effect on head and/or brain injury.

Experts said people who have an accident will benefit from cushioning of their arms, shoulders and chest to reduce the potential severity of a collision between their head and the road surface.

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Conclusion: The driving posture of electric scooter riders may increase the risk of head or brain injuries during accidents and collisions, a new study suggests

Chinese researchers recreated a series of specific accident scenarios through computational methods to examine how cranial injuries are affected by collisions or mechanical failure with fixed obstacles.

Chinese researchers recreated a series of specific accident scenarios through computational methods to examine how cranial injuries are affected by collisions or mechanical failure with fixed obstacles.

They found that half of the riders in their scenarios had a 50 percent chance of a skull fracture, while many had a 50 percent risk of serious brain injury.

Typically, a high speed played a significant role in causing the injury and how severe that injury was, said researchers from Changsha University of Science and Technology in China.

However, there was no clear difference in head kinematics and injury risk between single- and two-wheeled scooters.

The researchers decided to study in view of the increasing Number of traffic accidents related to Electric Self-Balancing Scooters (ESS) in the last few years.

Experts looked at some crash scenarios based on ‘failed’ videos online and then assessed the rider’s risk of head or brain injury.

Experts said people who have had an accident would benefit from cushioning of their arms, shoulders and chest to reduce the potential severity of a collision between their head and the road surface (stock image)

Experts said people who have had an accident would benefit from cushioning of their arms, shoulders and chest to reduce the potential severity of a collision between their head and the road surface (stock image)

They wrote in their paper: ‘The results showed that there is no clear difference in head kinematics and head injury risks in the two types of ESS (single and two wheeler).’

The researchers noted that ‘half of the ESS riders analyzed had a 50 percent chance of a skull fracture’, and that ‘higher ESS speeds generate higher levels of predictable head injury parameters’.

“Our results suggest that accident-prone ESS riders would benefit from cushioning of their arms, shoulders and chest to reduce the potential severity of a collision between their head and the road surface,” he said.

‘These findings will provide theoretical support for preventing head injury among ESS riders, and data support for developing and legislating ESS.’

The study has been published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface,

Major insurers say e-scooters pose risk to all road users without strict regulations

Insurance industry bodies say there is a need for stronger regulations and enforcement for the use of e-scooters amid apprehensions about their safety.

Government figures show there were 882 equipment-related accidents across the UK in the year ending June 2021.

This resulted in 931 casualties – 732 of which were e-scooter users.

In a letter to Transport Secretary Grant Shapps, bodies such as the Association of British Insurers said there are concerns about the risk to all road users until stronger regulation is in place beyond official tests.

It called for consistent standards on e-scooter manufacturing and safety, including whether wearing a helmet is mandatory.

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Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk /

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