Rising ocean temperatures in the Pacific are changing the West Coast’s precipitation patterns and could cause the climates to SWITCH, damning study finds 

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  • Rising sea temperatures in the Pacific are changing the western coast’s rainfall patterns
  • Ultimately, the climate of the Pacific Northwest and Southwest may change
  • As scientists thought, the changes don’t require the presence of an ice sheet
  • During the Last Glacial Maximum, large ice sheets rolled over North America, causing a dramatic change in atmospheric circulation

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A new study suggests that rising ocean temperatures in the Pacific are at the core of the West Coast’s precipitation patterns, driving winter storms, and could alter the climate of the Pacific Northwest and Southwest.

Researchers from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Colorado have determined that ocean temperatures and the planet’s ice sheets are not ‘directly responsible’ for changing the atmosphere of the North Pacific and the West Huh. Coastal rainfall patterns.

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This happened during the Last Glacial Maximum, which occurred between 31,000 and 16,000 years ago and is still happening.

The researchers said the changes are remarkable given the fact that it does not require an ice sheet.

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Rising sea temperatures in the Pacific are changing the western coast’s rainfall patterns

The climate of the Pacific Northwest and Southwest may change, similar to what happened during the Last Glacial Maximum

The climate of the Pacific Northwest and Southwest may change, similar to what happened during the Last Glacial Maximum

Scientists originally thought that during the Last Glacial Maximum, about 20,000 years ago, large ice sheets loomed large over North America, and these ice sheets caused dramatic changes in atmospheric circulation.

Given that Pacific Ocean temperatures and west coast rainfall patterns are linked, this could mean a ‘dramatic change’ in the west coast’s climate in a relatively short period of time.

“It is clearly plausible that we can obtain ocean temperature patterns in the North Pacific similar to those observed during the last glacial period,” said study lead author Dillon Amaya.

‘This could lead to dramatic changes in West Coast hydroclimates in a relatively short period of time, like decades.’

The changes don't require the presence of an ice sheet, as scientists previously thought

The changes don’t require the presence of an ice sheet, as scientists previously thought

During the Last Glacial Maximum, large ice sheets rolled over North America, causing a dramatic change in atmospheric circulation

During the Last Glacial Maximum, large ice sheets rolled over North America, causing a dramatic change in atmospheric circulation

Amaya noted that although no change occurred, a nearly 2-mile-long (3 kilometer) ice sheet would ‘suddenly’ appear over North America, a modern climate ‘may produce similar changes in North Pacific Ocean temperatures that temporarily may change the climate of the Southwest. and the Pacific Northwest.’

Scientists originally thought that during the Last Glacial Maximum, about 20,000 years ago, large ice sheets loomed large over North America, and these ice sheets caused dramatic changes in atmospheric circulation.

“This study highlights the need for a holistic view of the climate system, particularly when modeling its past and future behavior,” said co-author and CIRES Fellow Chris Karnauskas in a statement. Statement,

‘Without accounting for the interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean, you could end up with the right answer for the wrong reason, which is certainly riskier when you extrapolate that information to future concerns like freshwater availability. Let’s try to do it.’

The study shows that the ocean temperatures of the Last Glacial Maximum were not unique to that time period.

The researchers note that during this period, the southwestern US was full of rainfall and the Pacific northwest was dry, which is significantly different from these regions today.

It was believed that the ice sheets of the Northern Hemisphere act as a barrier and push the North Pacific jet stream and storms south, but after researching deeply, they found that this was not the case.

‘There is also a thermodynamic effect of having a really shiny ice sheet that reflects a lot of sunlight,’ Amaya explained. ‘It creates cooling that also accommodates atmospheric circulation.’

Study shows ocean temperatures of last glacial maximum were not unique to that time period

Study shows ocean temperatures of last glacial maximum were not unique to that time period

The researchers used a climate model that simulated the ocean’s response to ice sheets and how it interacts with the atmosphere to come up with their findings.

“This study highlights the need for a holistic approach to the climate system, especially when modeling its past and future behavior,” said co-author and CIRES Fellow Chris Karnauskas.

‘Without accounting for the interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean, you could end up with the right answer for the wrong reason, which is certainly riskier when you extrapolate that information to future concerns like freshwater availability. Let’s try to do it.’

“It is clearly plausible that we can find ocean temperature patterns in the North Pacific similar to what we saw during the last glacial period,” Amaya said.

‘This could lead to dramatic changes in West Coast hydroclimates in a relatively short period of time, like decades.

Although ice sheets do not play a major role in pushing storms south, they do play a role, although it can be considered behind the scenes.

The study was recently published in Scientific Journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters,

Sea level could rise up to 4 feet by 2300

Scientists have warned that global sea levels could rise by as much as 1.2 meters (4 feet) by 2300, despite meeting the 2015 Paris climate goals.

Long-term change will be driven by melting ice from Greenland to Antarctica that is set to redraw global coastlines.

Sea level rise threatens cities from Shanghai to London, low-lying areas of Florida or Bangladesh, and entire countries such as the Maldives.

It is important that we curb emissions as soon as possible, to avoid an even greater increase, a German-led team of researchers said in a new report.

Up to 2300…

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