Round the clock! Some carnivores, such as bears, wild cats and civets may change their hunting schedule to avoid each other to conserve resources and survive, study suggests 

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  • Some carnivores such as bears, wild cats and civets may avoid each other to conserve resources and survive
  • Experts spotted 9 species in three years at three sites in Borneo
  • Of the nocturnal species, six had some overlap in activity, two searched for food during the day and one was always active, regardless of time.
  • Experts said tourism in the region plays a role in mammal behavior
  • More studies are needed to determine if carnivores are avoiding each other or if something else is distancing them from themselves.

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A new study suggests that some species of carnivore, such as bears, feral cats and civets may actually avoid each other in an effort to conserve resources and survive.

A group of researchers from Hiroshima University in Japan observed nine species (a bear, three different civets, two feral cats, a skunk, a mustelid and a linsang) over a period of more than three years at different sites. Borneo, the third largest island in the world.

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They found that six of the nocturnal species – three different civets, one feral cats, one skunk and linsang – had some overlap in activity.

Another mustelid (in this case, a smoot otter) of the wild cats liked to rummage during the day.

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In contrast, the bear was active throughout the day, regardless of time.

Upper left to lower right: sun bear, marbled cat, flat-headed cat, smooth beaver, yellow-throated marten, banded linsang, binturong, common palm civet, Malay civet. Some carnivores such as bears, wild cats and civets may avoid each other to conserve resources and survive. Experts spotted 9 species in three years at three sites in Borneo

They found that six of the nocturnal species – three different civets, one feral cats, one skunk and linsang – had overlap in activity.  Another mustelid (in this case, a smoot otter) of the wild cats liked to rummage during the day.  In contrast, the bear was active throughout the day regardless of time.

They found that six of the nocturnal species – three different civets, one feral cats, one skunk and linsang – had overlap in activity. Another mustelid (in this case, a smoot otter) of the wild cats liked to rummage during the day. In contrast, the bear was active throughout the day regardless of time.

The researchers were surprised that one of the feral cats was active at night while the other was active during the day and that all three civets were active at night, suggesting that this may be due to limited competition for food.

“Information about the temporal activity patterns of animals is important to assess responses to anthropogenic disturbances and allow the implementation of appropriate conservation measures,” study lead author Miyabi Nakabayashi said in a statement. Statement.

‘Camera trapping is one of the most useful techniques for studying cryptic and rare animals.’

This type of behavior, as carnivores spend their time searching for food, would not be uncommon in the animal kingdom.

Earlier this year, Australian researchers found that different species of shark hunt in shifts to avoid each other.

The researchers collected 37,379 photographs from 73 cameras at three sites in Borneo over three years, with the first camera being installed in 2010 and the last removed in 2016.

The researchers collected 37,379 photographs from 73 cameras at three sites in Borneo over three years, with the first camera being installed in 2010 and the last removed in 2016.

The researchers collected 37,379 photographs from 73 cameras at three sites in Borneo over three years, with the first camera being installed in 2010 and the last removed in 2016.

Experts also noted that tourism in the region plays a role in mammal behavior.

“About 20% of the world’s mammal species are threatened with extinction, mainly due to threats such as habitat loss and overexploitation,” Nakabayashi said.

Only one of the three sites had night tours.  Palm civets at the other two sites had 'obvious gains' in activity at night, while civets at sites with night tours had 'vague and delayed temporal movement'.

Only one of the three sites had night tours. Palm civets at the other two sites had ‘obvious gains’ in activity at night, while civets at sites with night tours had ‘vague and delayed temporal movement’.

Only one of the three sites had night tours.

According to the statement, there were ‘obvious gains’ in activity at night in palm civets at the other two sites, while there was ‘vague and delayed temporal movement’ in civets at sites with night tourism.

‘Potential benefits of ecotourism could include fewer threats to wildlife,’ Nakabayashi said.

‘But our results suggest that the temporal activity pattern of a species can be directly affected by tourism activity. The impact of tourism on animal behavior should be evaluated, even if it is non-lethal ecotourism.’

The researchers note that more studies are needed to determine whether the carnivores are actively avoiding each other or if something else is keeping them away from each other.

The researchers note that more studies are needed to determine whether the carnivores are actively avoiding each other or if something else is keeping them away from each other.

The researchers note that more studies are needed to determine whether the carnivores are actively avoiding each other or if something else is keeping them distanced from each other.

“Current information is too limited and sporadic to understand the basic behavior of mammals, which may affect progress in assessment and improvement of threatened status,” Nakabayashi said.

‘We must accumulate more information on rare species to determine their basic ecology and to assess whether current conservation management strategies are appropriate.’

The study was published earlier this month scientific report.

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