SIXTEEN US states have adult obesity rates of at least 35% – almost double the number from 2018, CDC report finds

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  • Sixteen states, including Alabama, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi and West Virginia, had an adult obesity rate of at least 35% in 2020.
  • The prevalence ranged from the lowest in Colorado at 24.2% to the highest in Mississippi at 39.7%.
  • Seven states had a white population with more than a third of obese adults, compared to 22 states for Hispanics and 25 states for black residents.
  • College-educated adults and those under the age of 24 were less likely to be obese than middle-aged adults with only a high school degree.
  • CDC warns obese people are at higher risk of serious illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19

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Sixteen US states now have at least 35 percent obesity rates — higher than ever, new maps show.

In 2020, more than a third of adults in Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia were dangerously overweight. Data released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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This is almost double the nine states in 2018 that saw the prevalence of obesity at or above 35 percent.

Colorado fared best, with an obesity rate of 24.2 percent, while Mississippi had the worst rate at 39.7 percent.

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Racial and ethnic disparities still persist with Hispanic residents three times more overweight than Hispanic residents three times overweight – and five times as many states with black residents at least 35 percent overweight.

In the annual report, researchers warn that obesity can worsen the outcomes of COVID-19, increasing the risk of serious illness, hospitalization, and even death.

A new CDC map found that 16 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia, have low rates of adult obesity. is less than 35. % (up)

The data came from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a survey conducted by the CDC and state health departments via telephone.

The CDC report showed that obesity rates among adults increased as a result of decreased education levels.

The obesity rate was 38.8 percent among adults without a high school degree, compared with 34 percent of adults with a high school degree, 34.1 percent of adults with some college, and 25 percent of college graduates.

Discrepancies between castes were also evident.

In just seven states, the prevalence of obesity among white adults was 35 percent or more.

By comparison, 22 states had similar obesity among Hispanic adults and 35 states had black populations, of whom at least a third were obese.

Asians were the least likely ethnic group to report higher rates of obesity. Of the 35 states with sufficient data, 33 reported rates of less than 20 percent.

The remaining two — South Carolina and Alaska — recorded rates of 23.7 percent and 25.5 percent, respectively.

Twenty-one states had Hispanic populations with more than a third of obese adults (above), three times the number of white states.

Twenty-one states had Hispanic populations with more than a third of obese adults (above), three times the number of white states.

Thirty-five states had a black population with more than a third of obese adults (above), more than five times the number of white states.

Thirty-five states had a black population with more than a third of obese adults (above), more than five times the number of white states.

The researchers also found that middle-aged adults were almost twice as likely to be dangerously overweight than younger adults.

Those aged 18 to 24 had the lowest rate of obesity at 19.5 percent while those aged 45 to 54 had the highest rate at 38.1 percent.

Disparities were also observed between regions of the Americas.

The Midwest and South were tied as the regions with the highest rates of adult obesity, at 34.1 percent each.

Meanwhile, West and Northeast sat at 29.3 per cent and 28 per cent, respectively.

Obesity is known to be a risk factor for many chronic health conditions including type 2 diabetes, stroke, heart attack and even some types of cancer.

In only seven states, the prevalence of obesity among white adults was 35 percent or more.

In only seven states, the prevalence of obesity among white adults was 35 percent or more.

Asians were the least likely ethnic group to report higher rates of obesity.  Of the 35 states with sufficient data, 33 reported rates of less than (above) 20%

Asians were the least likely ethnic group to report higher rates of obesity. Of the 35 states with sufficient data, 33 reported rates of less than (above) 20%

However, obese adults are also at an increased risk for serious consequences of COVID-19, including severe cases, hospitalization, and death.

a Study The 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic found that obese people were twice as likely to be hospitalized as the state’s population.

This means that a diagnosis of COVID-19 in obese people could put even more pressure on already overwhelmed hospitals.

Additionally, recently Study The University of Michigan School of Public Health found that obese adults who become infected with the flu are not only at higher risk of serious complications, but they remain contagious longer.

This means that obesity is associated with an increased risk of flu transmission. With 75 percent of American adults predicted to be overweight or obese by 2030, the flu, or coronavirus, could result in thousands more deaths.

Although it is not clear why obese adults are more contagious, scientists believe it may be that obesity alters the body’s immune response and leads to chronic inflammation.

The CDC authors wrote, ‘Changing the current course of obesity will require a sustained, comprehensive effort from all parts of society.

‘If we are to ensure health equity, we must acknowledge existing health inequalities and health inequalities and address social determinants of health such as poverty and lack of health care access.

‘These maps help to show that we need to focus efforts on preventing obesity and supporting individuals living with this disease.’

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