Smart ‘band-aid’ uses electrical current to heal wounds 25% FASTER than traditional methods by stimulating tissue to enhance recovery 

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  • Scientists develop a smart bandage that uses electrical stimulation and biosensors to speed up wound healing
  • The bandage is made of wireless circuitry and temperature sensors that can monitor the progress of wound healing
  • ‘This is an active healing tool that could change the standard of care in the treatment of chronic wounds,’ said the study’s co-authors.
  • In a preclinical wound model, the treated group of mice healed approximately 25% faster than the control group

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Scientists have created a smart ‘band-aid’ that uses electric currents to heal wounds up to 25 percent faster than conventional methods by stimulating tissue to accelerate wound healing.

The smart bandage is composed of wireless circuitry that uses the flow of electric currents and temperature sensors to monitor the progress of wound healing.

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According to the researchers, the high-tech device promotes faster wound closure, increases new blood flow to injured tissue and enhances skin recovery by reducing scar formation.

The wireless, high-tech bandage is the work of researchers at Stanford University and was featured in a paper published Nov. Nature Biotechnology,

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Scientists develop a smart bandage that can help speed up wound healing by monitoring and treating an injury at the same time

The smart bandage is composed of wireless circuitry (above) that uses the flow of electric currents and temperature sensors to monitor the progress of wound healing

The smart bandage is composed of wireless circuitry (above) that uses the flow of electric currents and temperature sensors to monitor the progress of wound healing

When a person’s wound has not yet healed or the bandage detects an infection – the sensors can apply more electrical stimulation to the wound area to help speed up tissue recovery and reduce infection.

Smart Bandage’s biosensors can track biophysical changes in the local environment and provide a real-time, fast and highly accurate way to measure wound status.

The researchers were able to track sensor data in real time on a smartphone without the need for wires.

‘In mice, we demonstrate that our wound care system can continuously monitor skin impedance and temperature and deliver electrical stimulation in response to the wound environment,’ the researchers’ study abstract states.

In preclinical wound models with rats, the treatment group healed approximately 25% faster than the control group.

“In sealing the wound, the smart bandage protects as well as heals,” Yuanwen Jiang, co-first author of the study and a post-doctoral scholar at the Stanford School of Engineering, said in a statement.

‘But it is not a passive device. It is an active healing tool that could change the standard of care in the treatment of chronic wounds.’

Smart Bandage's biosensors can track biophysical changes in the local environment and provide a real-time, fast and highly accurate way to measure wound status.

Smart Bandage’s biosensors can track biophysical changes in the local environment and provide a real-time, fast and highly accurate way to measure wound status.

The scientists also cautioned that the smart bandage is currently only a proof of concept and has some challenges.

The scientists also cautioned that the smart bandage is currently only a proof of concept and has some challenges.

The scientists wanted to determine why and how electrical stimulation promotes wound healing.

They now believe that electrical stimulation promotes the activation of pro-regenerative genes such as selenop, an anti-inflammatory gene that has been found to help with pathogen clearance and wound repair, as well as Epo, which is involved in muscle and tendon repair. Has been shown to enhance tissue growth.

In addition, electrical stimulation increased the amount of white blood cell populations, especially monocytes and macrophages, which may also play a role in some stages of wound healing.

‘With stimulation and sensing in one device, the smart bandage speeds up healing, but also keeps track as it heals the wound,’ said Artem Likewise, co-first author of the study and currently chair of the Department of Surgery and Professor Artem Trotsyuk told Biomedical Engineering at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

The scientists also cautioned that the smart bandage is currently only a proof of concept and has some challenges.

Those hurdles include scaling the size of the device down to human levels, reducing costs and solving long-term data storage issues.

All of those have to be addressed before they can be mass produced.

He also noted other potential sensors that could be added to the device, including those that measure metabolites and other biomarkers.

A potential roadblock to clinical use would be ‘hydrogel rejection’, which would cause a person’s skin to react to the device and create a poor gel-to-skin combination.

The researchers also noted other potential sensors that could be added to the device, including sensors that measure metabolites and other biomarkers.

The researchers also noted other potential sensors that could be added to the device, including sensors that measure metabolites and other biomarkers.

Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk /

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