Struggling to lose weight? STOP dieting like a man!Dr Sara Gottfried has devised a new hormone-focused diet, specially for midlife women, that promises to shift excess pounds. She says many diet plans fail because they are designed for men.

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  • Dr. Sarah Gottfried has been helping women who feel frozen for the past 15 years
  • Claims that many diet plans fail because they are designed by men for men
  • A hormone-focused diet designed for middle-aged women to shed the extra pounds
  • Rules include eating moderate amounts of protein and abstaining from alcohol.

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Some topics are misunderstood as women, food, and hormones. Like so many women, I easily lost my ability to manage my weight in my 30s. Looking back, it was probably caused by a combination of toxic stress, the demands of motherhood, and getting older.

But the experience inspired me to move my career as a doctor from gynecology to precision medicine, specializing in hormones. As a result, over the past 15 years I’ve been able to help many women who come to me tired, cranky, frazzled and — inevitably — despite their best efforts to exercise and eat, the extras they put in. Pound was mourning. in correct way.

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More often than not, these issues begin when women enter midlife. It becomes difficult to shed those holiday pounds. The diets you have turned to in the past are not yielding any results now.

Even more frustrating, a diet that works for the men in your life may not have the same effect for you.

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Dr. Sarah Gottfried (pictured) has designed a new hormone-focused diet, specifically for middle-aged women, that promises to shed the extra pounds

You may be surprised to learn that counting calories or running miles on a treadmill may not provide the solution. Instead, it lies in understanding female hormones.

After years of research, I’ve come up with a new hormone-focused diet, specially designed for middle-aged women, that promises to not only move those extra pounds but also make you eventually regain your strength. Allows you to feel like yourself.

Why does middle age spread to women?

Your metabolism is the sum of all the biochemical reactions in your body, including those related to hormones, that determine how you feel and determine how fast or slow you burn calories.

And as we get older, the whole process slows down.

Metabolic hormones are involved in thousands of subtle communications and processes in the body. They include hormones involved in satiety (leptin, insulin); appetite (ghrelin, cortisol); female properties (estrogen); more masculine properties (testosterone, which regulates vitality and muscles); and fat burning (insulin, growth hormone and cortisol).

Weight gain can begin as levels of several hormones in our 20s (testosterone, DHEA), 30 (growth hormone, progesterone) and 40/50 (estrogen) naturally begin to drop. At the same time, other key metabolic hormones — insulin and leptin (and its cousins ​​ghrelin, the hunger hormone) — may increase.

Together and individually, these hormones control our response to food. But the relationship is two-pronged: Food regulates those metabolic hormones, too.

It’s important to eat the right foods in the right way to support metabolism-boosting hormones and to avoid foods and lifestyle habits that slow your metabolism and contribute to premature aging.

Losing fat after age 35 isn’t so much about discipline as what to eat, when to eat and how your food talks to your hormones.

Dr. Sarah Gottfried (pictured) notes that focusing on your hormones can help improve metabolism, reduce fat, and maintain a healthy body weight by burning rather than storing fat.

Dr. Sarah Gottfried (pictured) notes that focusing on your hormones can help improve metabolism, reduce fat, and maintain a healthy body weight by burning rather than storing fat.

Our hormones rule our bodies, deciding how we think, feel and look. And while I can’t turn back the clock on giving you the hormones in your early 20s (and with their faster metabolism), the good news is there are science-based guidelines for getting the key hormones back into balance.

I’ve found that when you focus on your hormones, you can improve metabolism, reduce fat, and ultimately maintain a healthy body weight by burning fat instead of storing it. Plus, you can ward off unpleasant symptoms like fatigue, cravings, moodiness, insomnia and a weakened immune system.

We now know what works to resolve hormone imbalances, especially in women over the age of 35. The key is to start with your diet, because what you eat is the backbone of every hormone you make.

don’t diet like a man

Treat yourself to a sauna

Growth hormone helps maintain body fat, lean muscle, bone, tendons and brain function. It subsides in middle-aged women—but studies have shown that a 30- to 60-minute sauna boosts growth hormone by up to 140 percent after one session.

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I believe that many diet plans fail because they are designed by men for men and not for the complex hormonal needs of women.

For example, science shows that ketogenic diets (low in carbohydrates, high in fat) work better for men than women. We’re not entirely sure why women react differently, but hormones seem to play a primary role.

The fact is that women are twice as likely to suffer from stress, anxiety and depression than men. Women commonly experience thyroid problems and autoimmune issues. Women’s bodies do not always respond to carbohydrate restriction and calorie restriction.

So hormones decide your success (or not) on any diet. If you don’t include hormones in the equation, you won’t see the results you want.

For example, a ketogenic diet may not provide enough carbohydrates for middle-aged women. Carbs help to dampen the stress response, reduce cortisol, promote growth hormone, and support thyroid function.

Plus, estrogen levels can be out of balance in women who eat a ‘lazy keto’ diet, like fast-food burgers wrapped with bacon on top of lettuce, and enough to feed the good microbes in the gut. Forget eating vegetables. .

A healthy estrogen balance depends on a healthy ecosystem of microbes. But eating a lot of animal products (meat and cheese) while skimping on vegetables increases the levels of abused members of the estrogen family.

Dr. Sarah Gottfried (pictured) said that eating moderate amounts of protein can help jump-start growth hormone, testosterone and other metabolic hormones

Dr. Sarah Gottfried (pictured) said that having moderate meals…

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