Struggling to sculpt a six pack? Poor DNA might be to blame as people with ‘good’ genes can bulk up their muscles and get fit quicker, study finds

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  • Experts from Anglia Ruskin University review studies into fitness training outcomes
  • They found that 13 genes are responsible for how the body responds to exercise.
  • These are responsible for up to 72 percent of the variation in training outcomes given.
  • The remaining variation is the result of other factors – such as diet and nutrition.

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A study has found that people with ‘good’ genes are able to enlarge their muscles and get fit quicker – perhaps explaining why, for some, a six-pack remains elusive.

Researchers from Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge reviewed 24 previous studies to determine how genetics influences exercise training outcomes.

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For a set of exercises designed to improve muscle strength, the team found that genetic differences accounted for 72 percent of the variation in fitness outcomes.

And the researchers concluded that 13 genes are responsible for how the body responds to cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength and anaerobic power exercise.

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Based on their findings, the team suggests that genetic testing can be used to better train each individual person to achieve the best results.

A study finds that people with ‘good’ genes are able to enlarge their muscles and get fit quicker – perhaps explaining why, for some, a six-pack remains elusive.

benefits of exercise training

While participants in the study experienced varying results from their training regimen depending on their genetic makeup, all still showed improvements in fitness.

In fact, after an average of two weeks of training, subjects saw a 22 percent increase in strength, an 11 percent improvement in cardiovascular fitness, and a 12 percent increase in their anaerobic power.

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‘We know exercise is good for us, but we all improve at different rates even when following the same training regimens. That means there are other factors at play,’ said paper author and Anglia Ruskin University sports scientist Henry Chung.

In their study, Mr. Chung and his colleagues reviewed 24 previous studies that analyzed the results of experiments on a total of 3,012 adults aged 15-55 to assess whether genetics is related to three important areas of physical exercise. How can influence.

Specifically, these were anaerobic strength, cardiovascular fitness and muscle strength – representing, the team explained, important factors in shaping an individual’s fitness, quality of life and well-being.

In each experiment, all participants showed improvement in fitness after their exercise training, but to varying degrees even when subjects were following the same exercise routine.

“Our study found 13 genes that have a role in exercise outcomes, and we found that specific alleles contained in these genes are more conducive to certain aspects of fitness,” explained Mr. Chung.

“For example, with repetitive exercises designed to promote muscle strength, genetic differences explained 72 percent of the variation in people’s results after the same training,” Mr. Chung continued.

‘Since everyone’s genetic makeup is different, our bodies respond slightly differently to the same exercise.

‘Therefore, it should be possible to improve the effectiveness of an exercise regime by identifying one’s genotype and then designing a specific training program for them.

‘This can particularly benefit those who need to see improvement over a short period of time, such as hospital patients – or elite players, where a modest improvement can mean the difference between success and failure.’

For a set of exercises designed to improve muscle strength, the team found that genetic differences accounted for 72 percent of the variation in fitness outcomes.

For a set of exercises designed to improve muscle strength, the team found that genetic differences accounted for 72 percent of the variation in fitness outcomes.

The researchers also found that genetic variations accounted for 44 percent if the difference in results observed after cardiovascular fitness exercise and 10 percent after anaerobic power exercise.

The remaining variations, he explained, are influenced by other factors — including diet and nutrition, recovery and injuries.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal one more.

how much exercise do you need

To stay healthy, adults ages 19 to 64 should strive to be active every day and do the following:

  • at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week, such as cycling or brisk walking, and
  • Strength exercises that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abs, chest, shoulders and arms) 2 or more days a week.

Or:

  • 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity such as running or a game of singles tennis each week and
  • Strength exercises that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abs, chest, shoulders and arms) 2 or more days a week.

Or:

  • a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity each week – for example, 2 x 30 minutes of running and 30 minutes of brisk walking equals 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity and
  • Strength exercises that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abs, chest, shoulders and arms) 2 or more days a week.

A good rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous activity provides the same health benefits as 2 minutes of moderate activity.

One way to get your recommended 150 minutes of weekly physical activity is to do 30 minutes 5 days each week.

All adults should also break up long periods of sitting with light activity.

Source: NHS

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