Tadpoles can survive without BREATHING after scientists inject their hearts with algae in an experiment – and same technique could potentially keep stroke patients alive when the brain is starved of oxygen

- Advertisement -


  • Scientists turn off oxygen supply to tadpoles in lab setting
  • Tadpole hearts were injected with algae, which moved through their blood vessels to their brains
  • Light shone on the larvae, creating enough oxygen in the body to keep them alive

- Advertisement -

Tadpoles without the ability to breathe were kept alive in a new successful experiment that could potentially save the lives of stroke patients when oxygen to their brains was cut off.

Biologists from the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich injected algae into the tadpole’s heart, providing enough oxygen for the tailed amphibian larvae to effectively protect neurons in the oxygen-deprived brain.

advertisement

With each heartbeat, the algae moved through the blood vessels to the brain, turning the transparent tadpoles bright green.

The scientists then shed light on the tadpoles, prompting the algae to pump oxygen into nearby cells, similar to the process of photosynthesis.

- Advertisement -

Senior author Hans Straka from Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich said Statement: ‘Algae actually produce so much oxygen that they can bring nerve cells back to life, if you wish.

‘To many, it sounds like science fiction, but ultimately, it is the perfect combination of biological schemes and biological principles.’

scroll down for video

With each heartbeat, the algae moved through the blood vessels to the brain, turning the transparent tadpoles bright green.

Tadpoles without the ability to breathe were kept alive in a new successful experiment that could save the lives of stroke patients when oxygen to their brains was cut off

To really test the success, the scientists injected another group of tadpoles with strains of algae that hadn’t been mutated to increase the oxygen concentration, Scientist Report.

When there was a lack of oxygen from the tailed amphibians, the scientist noticed a decrease in nervous activity and then a complete stop.

However, the team then injected the tadpoles with the mutated algae, highlighting them, and within 15 to 20 minutes activity resumed.

The regenerated veins also performed better than or even before oxygen deprivation, indicating that the researchers’ method was quick and efficient.

Pictured is a close-up view of the tadpole's heart ventricle and the injection site for algae

Pictured is a close-up view of the tadpole’s heart ventricle and the injection site for algae

‘We were successful in showing a proof of theoretical experiment by this method. It was surprisingly reliable and sturdy, and in my eyes, a beautiful approach,’ Straka said.

‘Working in theory doesn’t really mean you can implement it in the end, but it’s a first step to start other studies.’

The team hopes this work will lead to new treatments for conditions induced by stroke or oxygen-scarce environments, such as underwater and high altitudes, but do know that algae are not ready to enter our bloodstream.

The scientists then shed light on the tadpoles, prompting the algae to pump oxygen into nearby cells.  The picture shows the algae going through the tadpole's blood vessels to its brain

The scientists then shed light on the tadpoles, prompting the algae to pump oxygen to nearby cells. The picture shows the algae going through the tadpole’s blood vessels to its brain

Diana Martinez, a neuroscientist at Rowan University in New Jersey who was not involved in the study, wrote in an email to The Scientist: ‘The first issue is that Xenopus laevis tadpoles are transparent and light readily activates the photosynthetic machinery. can pass through the skin. to produce oxygen.

‘Use in more complex animals. . . be difficult, as light does not easily pass through the skin and cannot reach the vasculature to activate photosynthetic organisms.’

Straka also envisions his research to benefit other laboratories that work with isolated tissues or organoids. The introduction of oxygen-producing algae could help these tissues thrive and increase their survival rates, potentially reducing the need for live animals for experiments.

‘You must have new ideas and new concepts to explore; It’s one of the ways science is conducted,’ Straka said.

‘If you are open-minded and think about it, then suddenly, you can see all the possibilities with one thought.’

.

- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories