Ten top tips to cut down your energy consumption Energy bills are expected to soar this winter

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  • Electricity bills may increase due to increase in wholesale prices
  • Many people are concerned about how they will pay for their energy.
  • We are telling you about some steps you can take to cut consumption and reduce bills.

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Energy bills are expected to rise this winter, due to a dramatic increase in wholesale costs.

While suppliers are trying to stay away altogether, consumers are concerned about how they will pay their heating bills if costs rise.

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It is believed that if the problem continues with most fixed deals, tariffs could rise by hundreds of pounds, which are now more expensive than default offers – which are usually priced much higher.

However, there are many ways families can save on their energy bills this winter.

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Energy bills expected to rise this winter, due to dramatic increase in wholesale costs

There are some things that households can do today for little or no cost – other measures will require more time and investment but will yield higher returns in the long term.

With the help of the Energy Saving Trust, That’s the Money, reveals ten top tips to help you start cutting your energy use — and saving on your bills.

1. Heating Control

Make sure you understand your heating controls and set them to only heat rooms when you need them, not above the required temperature.

To do this effectively, you’ll need a decent set of heating controls, including a timer or programmer for most central heating systems, a room thermostat, and thermostatic radiator valves.

Fitting and using them correctly can save you £70 a year on your bills and reduce your carbon emissions by 300kg – a three bedroom, semi-detached home, on a gas-heated basis Feather.

Lowering the thermostat by just 1°C can save you up to £80 per year.

Smart heating controls provide more options for managing your heating system and are available for all types of heating, including electric storage heating.

Some systems include advanced features, such as automation, to help determine when to turn heating on and off, saving on energy use.

Installing solid wall insulation could save a heated, semi-detached home about 890 kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions a year from the gas

Installing solid wall insulation could save a heated, semi-detached home about 890 kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions a year from the gas

2. Draft-proofing

Homes can lose heat through gaps around windows and doors, floorboards or chimneys, and this loss may occur more frequently in older homes.

Draft-proofing can be an easy and cost-effective way to save energy and reduce costs in these areas.

Quick and simple DIY solutions include fitting foam strips, plastic seals or brushes around doors and windows.

You can seal the gap between the floor and the skirting board with a sealant purchased from any DIY store or online.

Professional draft-proofing of your home can cost around £200 depending on a typical semi-detached property, and may be worth considering especially if you have traditional features such as sash windows.

3. Energy saving on water usage

In the UK, we use an average of 145 liters of water per person per day, with an estimated 22 per cent of our heating bills related to hot water.

There are lots of water-saving products available that can reduce the energy used to heat your water and, if you have a meter, your water bill as well.

If your shower fills with hot water directly from your boiler or hot water tank instead of an electric shower, a water-efficient aerated shower head will reduce the amount of water you use without affecting pressure. , and can reduce your water usage. About 32 liters per day.

SAVE: Insulate any exposed hot water pipes, for quick and cost-effective fixes

SAVE: Insulate any exposed hot water pipes, for quick and cost-effective fixes

4. Energy Efficient Appliances

The use of your washing machine and dishwasher, along with cooking, cooling or freezing, accounts for about 12 percent of total household energy consumption.

You can reduce your energy use by making small changes to your habits, such as using the ‘Eco’ mode on devices.

These models use lower wash and rinse temperatures therefore use less energy for heating and reduce the amount of water required while achieving a satisfactory range for dirt removal.

5. Keep devices away from standby

The average UK home appliance costs £35 a year for electrical appliances left on standby, so turn them off where you can.

If you want to replace an appliance, choosing a model with a higher energy efficiency rating that meets your needs and budget will reduce your home’s carbon emissions.

6. Energy Efficient Lighting

LED bulbs are the most efficient and sustainable lighting technology and are suitable for all uses, including dim lighting, spotlights and outdoor lighting.

Replacing every bulb in your home with an LED can save you 65 kilos of carbon emissions annually – the equivalent of driving your car about 220 miles.

LED bulbs are the most efficient and sustainable lighting technology and are suitable for all uses

LED bulbs are the most efficient and sustainable lighting technology and are suitable for all uses

7. Monitor the use of kitchen equipment

Reducing your dishwasher usage to less than one cycle per week can save you £8 per year on energy.

Meanwhile, reducing your washing machine usage to one cycle per week can save you an extra £8.

Fill the kettle with only how much water you need and save around £6 per year.

8. Washing at low temperature

Not only can reducing your washing time help save money, but washing at a lower temperature can also help.

Higher temperatures are not always necessary when using a washing machine and washing at 30 degrees is generally very effective. In fact, heat can set many stains.

Washing at 30 degrees is also much better for the environment and costs less per cycle in terms of energy than a hot wash.

9. Insulation

There are also some expensive options, such as insulation. While these cost more than everyday changes, it will save you a lot in the long term.

Good insulation is the key to making your home more energy efficient and it often makes sense to upgrade your insulation before upgrading your heating system.

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