Terrifying video reveals how normal breathing can spread Covid more than 7ft through the air in 90 seconds without a face mask – but just 2.4ft when you’re wearing a covering


  • Scientists used computer simulation of breathing with and without masks
  • Without a mask, droplets of saliva can travel up to 7.2 feet (2.2 meters) in the air.
  • However, when a face mask is worn, simulations show that these droplets travel a distance of just 2.4 feet (0.7 m) in this time.

While face masks were once seen as rare, they have become mandatory in many settings, including supermarkets and public transport, amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Now, a new simulation has shown how effective face masks are in stopping the spread of the virus.

The researchers used computer simulations to demonstrate how far droplets of saliva could travel through normal breathing with and without a face mask.

Their findings suggest that droplets can travel up to 7.2 feet (2.2 m) in the air without a face mask – but just 2.4 feet (0.72 m) when wearing a mask.

The team hopes the findings will encourage people to maintain social distancing as restrictions begin to ease around the world.

Their findings suggest that droplets can travel up to 7.2 feet (2.2 m) in the air without a face mask – but just 2.4 feet (0.72 m) when the mask is worn.

Plastic face shields do not protect against Kovid-19

A study suggests that if an infected person sneezes without a mask, the face shield does not provide any protection against the coronavirus.

Researchers used computer models to visualize the spread of droplets around a face shield ejected by a human sneeze from 3 feet (1 m) away.

This suggests that the ‘vortex rings’ produced by sneezes carry infectious particles to the face shield in less than a second and stick to the edges of the plastic.

Researchers say that if the timing of this wave of coronavirus particles coincides with the breathing of the wearer of the face shield, then the person can become infected.

Previous research has found that shields are also useless at trapping aerosols, indicating that an infected person can still spread the virus.

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While previous research focused on the spread of airborne droplets when coughing or sneezing, researchers from Stony Brook University, Harvard, ETH Zurich and Hanyang University were interested in seeing how the droplets spread during normal breathing.

The international team used computer simulations of normal breath to produce periodic jet streams of droplets of saliva at the speed of about one-tenth that of a cough or sneeze.

Simulations showed that normal breathing could move droplets of saliva up to 7.2 feet (2.2 meters) through the air in just 90 seconds.

However, when a face mask is worn, simulations show that these droplets travel a distance of just 2.4 feet (0.7 m) in this time.

Study author Ali Khosronejad said: ‘Our results suggest that normal breathing without a face mask generates periodic trailing jets and leading circular vortex rings that move forward and interact with the vortex flow structures produced in the prior breathing cycles. Huh.’

During unmasked breathing, a complex vortex field can carry droplets over long distances, the team explained.

However, a face mask dissipates the kinetic energy of the jet generated by inhalation, obstructing the vortices and limiting the movement of saliva droplets.

The team also looked at the effect of evaporation of droplets of saliva.

When no mask was worn, they found that droplets of saliva had partially evaporated in front of the respiratory plume, reaching a size of just one-tenth of a micron.

The concern is that in stagnant indoor air, droplets of this size will remain in the daytime air, according to the team.

In contrast, face masks were found to partially redirect the breath downward, reducing the risk of suspended droplets remaining in the air.

A face mask dissipates the kinetic energy of the jet generated by exhalation, disrupts the vortices and limits the movement of saliva droplets (stock image)

A face mask dissipates the kinetic energy of the jet generated by exhalation, disrupts the vortices and limits the movement of saliva droplets (stock image)

“To simplify the breathing process, we did not consider the flow of the air-saliva mixture through the nose and only accounted for the flow through the mouth,” said Ms Khosronejad.

‘In future studies, we will explore the effect of normal breathing through both the nose and the mouth.’

In England, a face covering is mandatory in many settings unless you are medically exempt.

This includes public transport, shopping centres, places of worship and restaurants and pubs (when you are not sitting at your desk).

The UK government explained: ‘You are expected to wear a face covering before entering any of these settings and to put it on unless there is a reasonable excuse to remove it.

‘You should also wear a face covering in indoor places not listed here, where social distancing can be difficult and where you will come into contact with people you don’t normally meet.’

Tall COVID: What is it and can it be four different syndromes?

COVID-19 is described as a short-term illness caused by infection with the novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Public health officials say people will recover within two weeks.

However it has become increasingly clear that this is not the case for everyone, and that the two-week period is simply the ‘acute illness’ phase.

The Discover project of the North Bristol NHS Trust, which is studying the long-term effects of the coronavirus, found that out of a total of 110 patients screened for three months, most (74 per cent) had at least one persistent symptom after twelve . Week. The most common were:

  • Extreme fatigue: 39%
  • Breathlessness: 39%
  • Insomnia: 24%
  • Muscle aches: 23%
  • Chest pain: 13%
  • Cough: 12%
  • Loss of smell: 12%
  • Headache, fever, joint pain and diarrhea: less than 10% each

Other chronic symptoms that have been reported by COVID-19 survivors, both suspected and confirmed, include hearing problems, ‘brain fog’, memory loss, lack of concentration, mental health problems and hair loss.

The effects of long covid on people who had mild illness have not been studied in depth.

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