Texas abortion law critics are targeting these corporate donors and Texas-based companies

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  • Corporate Accountability Action found that Dallas-based telecommunications company AT&T donated more than $645,000 over the past two years to about 22 lawmakers who sponsored the Texas abortion ban.
  • Tesla CEO Elon Musk donates $2,800 each to three anti-abortion Republican lawmakers and four Democratic lawmakers who support abortion rights
  • Time Warner Cable/Charter Communications donated $523,661 and NBC Universal gave $88,000 to the Texas Bill’s primary sponsors.

enemies of Texas ‘abortion ban’ The bill’s sponsors are targeting companies donating money, in hopes that consumers will pressure Corporate America to join the fight against an escalation of sanctions.

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Texas’ ban is the strictest in the country and allows private citizens to prosecute individuals who assist women who have abortions after the first six weeks of pregnancy. The state’s top consumer and tech companies have been absolutely silent about the new law, and some have been targeted by reproductive rights activists. Donations to MPs who passed bills.

Television and digital advertising Launched last week by the Democratic Party’s opposition research arm, Corporate Accountability Action and American Bridge 21st Century, it highlighted contributions from Texas Republican lawmakers from AT&T, Time Warner Cable/Charter Communications and NBC Universal.

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Corporate Accountability Action (CAA) found that Dallas-based telecommunications company AT&T donated more than $645,000 over the past two years to about 22 lawmakers who sponsored the measure. Time Warner Cable/Charter Communications donated $523,661, and NBC Universal gave $88,000 to primary sponsors in Texas, CAA. informed of.

AT&T said in a statement that it does not take a position on the abortion issue or support legislation called Senate Bill 8, and gives money to legislators on both sides.

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However, pro-choice activists and Democrats remain vocally critical of AT&T and other companies’ ambitions toward the bill.

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“This is a moment in our country where there is no middle ground. You can’t really be on edge,” said Cecil Richards, former president of Planned Parenthood and current co-chair of American Bridge 21st Century.

Why are companies silent while others speak up?

Some companies, such as customer-management firm Salesforce and dating apps such as Bumble and Match.com, pushed back against Texas abortion laws after it went into effect a month ago.

CNBC informed that sales force A slack message told employees it would help them move “if you have concerns about access to reproductive health care in your state.”

Friday Night, CEO Marc Benioff tweeted A post about the story, “Ohana we’ll help you get out of TX if you want to move on. Your choice.”

In an internal memo to Match.com shared with Granthshala, CEO Shar Dubey wrote, “I came to the US from India 25 years ago and I must say, as a Texas resident, I am shocked that I am now in such a state of mind. I live in a state where women’s reproductive laws are more regressive than most countries in the world including India.Surely everyone should see the danger of this highly punitive and unfair law which makes no exception even for victims of rape or incest I hate our state. Take this big step in women’s rights.”

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Match.com and bumble Both have established funds to assist women seeking abortion care in other states.

However, many more CEOs remained silent.

“Silence is a signal. Silence is a message, the message is, ‘Listen, we’re a little worried right now, because we don’t want to jump out there and isolate half of the market,'” says Dr. Americas Reid, branding expert and professor of marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Reid points out that companies should take one of two approaches, either keeping quiet to avoid alienating their customer base or taking a stronger stance for or against the issue. Reid says that trying to tow a middle line rarely does well for a company.

For either option, “there’s a list of pros and a list of cons, on the consumer side, on the labor market side, on the internal side, within the C-suite,” Reid says.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted on September 2, two days after the ban, “In general, I believe the government should rarely impose its will on the people, and while doing so, their cumulative happiness.” That said, I would prefer to stay out of politics.”

Musk announced last week that Tesla was planning to move its headquarters From the San Francisco Bay Area to the capital of Texas, Austin.

CNBC informed of According to the Money-in-Politics tracker, Musk donated last year to three anti-abortion Republican lawmakers and four Democratic lawmakers who support abortion rights, giving $2,800 each. OpenSecrets.org.

The anti-abortion group Texas Right to Life pointed out that donation companies cannot support everything the candidates stand for. “We hope that people in Texas and companies in Texas will not succumb to ‘cancelling the culture,'” spokeswoman Kimberlin Schwartz said.

Abortion rights advocates say the companies being called out are backing politicians whose positions contradict the public messages corporations use to lure consumers.

“You can’t say ’empower women’ on the one hand, and on the other, your political money is going to people who are really, really disabling women,” Richard said. “This kind of accountability is clearly long overdue.”

The Associated Press’s Lindsey Whitehurst contributed. Michelle Shen is a Money & Tech digital reporter for USA Today. You can reach me on Twitter @michelle_shen10.



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