The defiant city that won’t go woke: People power saves Sheffield street names with links to the Empire 

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  • Sheffield street names targeted by awakened preachers to be named
  • Canning Street is after George Canning, who campaigned against freeing slaves.
  • Gladstone Road is named after William Gladstone, whose father was a slave owner.
  • Residents were asked their views and said they did not want to see change

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Street Names that have been falsified by Zac preachers will be kept because residents do not want to change them.

This comes after experts claimed that Sheffield had a series of streets linked to people ‘involved in slavery’ and ‘violently repressed’.

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Canning Street was named after former Prime Minister George Canning, who campaigned against freeing slaves.

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Streets that have come under fire by Jago campaigners will be named because residents do not want them to be changed. Gladstone Road (pictured) was named after former Prime Minister William Gladstone

Gladstone Road was named after former PM William Gladstone.

He called slavery – which was outlawed in 1834 – as the ‘worst crime’ in British history, but in his younger days he supported compensation for slave owners.

His father was one of the largest slave owners in the British Empire.

Peel Street was founded in memory of another ex-PM, Sir Robert Peel, the founder of modern-day police, but his father supported slavery, fearing that its abolition would harm the cotton trade. .

Other town streets include Canon Hall Road, which was named after a stately house whose owner’s brother was involved in slavery.

He used the name of the mansion on a slave ship, but the house was later owned by an anti-slavery campaigner.

William Gladstone (pictured) called slavery – which was outlawed in 1834 – the 'worst crime' in UK history, but in his younger days he supported compensation for slave owners

William Gladstone (pictured) called slavery – which was outlawed in 1834 – the ‘worst crime’ in UK history, but in his younger days he supported compensation for slave owners

A report presented to the Race Equality Commission in Sheffield this year claimed that there are aspects of the city’s geography that “perpetuate racist, outdated and uncomfortable messages”.

The report found that 100 monuments were dedicated to white people. And some depictions of non-whites in the city are ‘likely to be considered stereotypical and negative’, such as a carved head with a turban.

Only one plaque issued under the Sheffield Legends scheme honoring celebrities was dedicated to someone from an ethnically diverse background – Olympian Dame Jessica Ennis-Hill.

Residents were asked their views in consultation but said they did not want to see change.

A spokesman for the city council said: ‘We accept this strong sentiment and do not currently intend to change the name of any existing street or remove any statues.’

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