The hard reality of increased density

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As housing prices continue to rise in Canada’s larger cities, the debate often boils down to where, how and when to build more homes in existing neighborhoods.

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On a macro level, there are election promises from federal and provincial governments that claim to “say yes” to the construction of millions of new homes. But at the microscopic level, it is not difficult to find examples of bitter fights over the status quo in most cities.

An application by Haven Developments to take two single-family homes in Toronto’s Deer Park neighborhood and convert them into 12-unit condo buildings exposes all of the legal and political forces that can engulf a single new city in Canada’s largest city. Waging a war on the construction of apartments.

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“We are replacing two houses with 12, and it is a very large piece of land for two houses,” said architect Roland Rom Kolthoff of Raw Design, who is planning the proposal at 101-103 Heath St. ” We started working on it in 2018; We’re three years into the process and it’s still nowhere. I’ve had huge buildings that have sailed through approvals. And you wonder why we have a housing crisis. “

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Eglinton Avenue. W

Yong ST.

Davisville Avenue.

Mount Pleasant Rd.

Toronto

Mount Pleasant

Cemetery

deer Park

heather

scheduled tribe. Claire Avenue. W

Avenue Rd.

0

350

meters

, Source: TileZen; to open-

streetmap contributor

Bayview Avenue.

Eglinton Avenue. W

Yong ST.

Davisville Avenue.

Mount Pleasant Rd.

Toronto

Mount Pleasant

Cemetery

deer Park

heather

scheduled tribe. Claire Avenue. W

0

350

Avenue Rd.

meters

, Source: TileZen; OpenStreetMap

contributors

Bayview Avenue.

Eglinton Avenue. W

Yong ST.

Davisville Avenue.

Toronto

Mount Pleasant Rd.

Mount Pleasant

Cemetery

deer Park

heather

scheduled tribe. Claire Avenue. W

0

350

Avenue Rd.

meters

, Source: TileZen; OpenstreetmapContributor

The project is the typical missing middle typology: neither a six to 12 storey mid-rise, nor a single family dwelling. It is three storeys tall with a parking garage and is in a neighborhood that has other apartment buildings of similar scale across the street. The construction only required some minor variation approval from Toronto’s Adjustment Committee (COA) and the resolution of some mature trees that span the neighboring lots.

The project came up for vote in Toronto’s adjustment committee in July, but a decision was postponed until December. Toronto-St. Paul’s councilor Josh Matlow does not have a vote on the COA and will not vote on the development in council because unlike the typical high-rise building the project does not require a change in bylaws to proceed. Still, he says he urged the committee to defer a decision…

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