The only total solar eclipse of 2021 will take place TOMORROW morning, plunging parts of Antarctica into darkness for two minutes, NASA says

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  • A total solar eclipse occurs at approximately 07:33 GMT. but will reach its greatest extent
  • However, it will only be visible to visitors near the coast of the Ronne Ice Shelf.
  • Partial Solar Eclipse in Australia, Chile and NZ. will appear in the areas of
  • The next total solar eclipse will occur in the US on April 8, 2024

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this year only total solar eclipse Tomorrow morning, parts of Antarctica will plunge into darkness for two minutes, NASA has said.

The rare spectacle of the Moon blocking the Sun will reach its greatest extent for viewers near the edge of Antarctica at around 07:33 GMT. Roan Ice Shelf.

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The eclipse will provide little respite from the long summer day Antarctica has been experiencing since October – in fact, the Sun won’t be there again until April.

While it may be largely missed, viewers elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere, including parts of Australia, Chile and New Zealand, will see a partial eclipse.

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A solar eclipse occurs approximately every six months, as the Moon does not orbit the Earth completely in the same plane as it revolves around the Sun.

On top of this, total solar eclipses are about three times as rare and are only seen in the 60-160-mile-wide path of the Moon’s shadow.

The next total solar eclipse won’t occur until April 8, 2024, but unlike Saturday’s event, it will be widely visible in parts of Canada, Mexico, and the United States.

Meanwhile, in Europe, a total solar eclipse is unlikely this century.

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NASA has said that this year’s only total solar eclipse will occur tomorrow morning, with parts of Antarctica getting dark for two minutes. Image: Total Solar Eclipse

The rare spectacle of the Moon blocking the Sun will reach its greatest extent at around 07:33 GMT for onlookers on the edge of Antarctica's Rhone Ice Shelf.

The rare spectacle of the Moon blocking the Sun will reach its greatest extent at around 07:33 GMT for onlookers on the edge of Antarctica’s Rhone Ice Shelf.

safely watching a solar eclipse

It is not safe to look directly at the Sun, even if the Sun is partially or mostly obscured.

When viewing a partial solar eclipse, if you want to face the sun, you should wear sun darshan or eclipse glasses during the entire eclipse.

Solar view or eclipse glasses are not regular sunglasses.

Regular sunglasses are not safe for viewing the sun.

If you are in the path of a total solar eclipse, you can take off your sun darshan or eclipse glasses only when the moon completely blocks the sun.

If you don’t have sun glasses or eclipse glasses, you can use an alternative indirect method, such as a pinhole projector,

Pinhole projectors should not be used to view the Sun directly, but to project sunlight onto the surface.

Source: NASA

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A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun, casting a shadow on the Earth. There are different types depending on how obscure the Sun appears to an onlooker at a given location.

For a total solar eclipse, all three celestial bodies must be in a straight line.

Viewers see the sky become very dark, as in dawn or dusk, while it may also be possible to see the Sun’s corona, or the outer atmosphere around the Moon.

The corona is usually covered by the bright face of the Sun.

A similar phenomenon, an annual solar eclipse, occurs when the Moon appears slightly smaller than the Sun, fails to block it completely and leaves a so-called ‘annular ring’ around it at the time of the greatest eclipse. .

The next annular eclipse will cross North America on October 14, 2023.

While tomorrow’s total solar eclipse will be almost completely unobservable, many places in the Southern Hemisphere will still find a treat, NASA explained.

It said, ‘In some places, where viewers will not get to see a total solar eclipse, they will instead experience a partial solar eclipse. blog post,

It occurs when the Sun, Moon and Earth are not in exactly one line. A dark shadow will be visible only over a portion of the Sun’s surface, and daylight is affected only when more than 80 percent of the Sun’s surface is obscured.

“Viewers in Saint Helena, Namibia, Lesotho, South Africa, South Georgia and parts of the Sandwich Islands, the Crozet Islands, the Falkland Islands, Chile, New Zealand and parts of Australia will see a partial solar eclipse on December 4,” the space agency said.

For viewers in Australia, Hobart will enjoy the largest eclipse of all capital cities – but only 11 percent of the Sun’s field of view will be obscured.

In Melbourne, this figure will drop to just two percent, while in Canberra the event will be barely visible because the Sun will be crossing the horizon at the time of maximum eclipse.

A similarly modest show would be seen in New Zealand’s South Island, with audiences in Invercargill only four percent to the Sun and Queenstown to the north at 0.7 percent.

When viewers in Australia and New Zealand can see a partial eclipse
LocationAustraliaNew Zealand
hobartaidMelbourneAEDcanberraidinvercargillNZDTQueenstownNZDT
eclipse start7:34 pm7:53 pm7:57 pm9:12 am9:14 pm
eclipse max8:06 pm8:12 am8:02 pm9:18 pm9:16 pm
obscure amount of sun1 1%2%0.6%4%0.7%
Sun set8:35 pm8:29 pm8:05 pm9:25 pm9:18 pm
Source: timeanddate.com

While tomorrow's eclipse may be largely missed in Antarctica (pictured), viewers elsewhere in the hemisphere, including parts of Australia, Chile and New Zealand, will see a partial eclipse

While tomorrow’s eclipse may be largely missed in Antarctica (pictured), viewers elsewhere in the hemisphere, including parts of Australia, Chile and New Zealand, will see a partial eclipse

NASA has warned that in many of these places, partial eclipses will occur either at sunrise or sunset.

Accordingly, viewers wishing to view the event must have a clear view of the horizon to be able to actually see the eclipse.

Weather permitting, NASA plans to livestream a view of the total solar eclipse as seen from Antarctica’s Union Glacier, both days youtube And this NASA website,

The stream – provided by JM Pasachoff Antarctic Expedition – will begin at 1:30 a.m. EST…

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