The VERY scandalous history of the honey trap is recounted in a new book – from the ring of seduction run by Catherine de Medici to the English wife who bedded a Navy official for her German spy husband

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  • The author Henry R. Schlesinger traces the history of the honey trap in new book
  • Fascinating examples include a Venetian minister duped by his mistress
  • It also explains how the invention of technology has shaped the methods of espionage.
  • Honey Trapped: Sex, Betrayal and Weaponized Love, by Schlesinger, is out now

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Sex, espionage, mystery and scandal, it’s no surprise that society can’t resist a honey trap story.

From Greek mythology to James Bond, examples of the use of sex as a weapon in espionage have been recorded throughout history and have become a mainstay in popular books, TV shows, and movies.

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So-called honey trap operations, where female operatives are dispatched with a mission to entice a target, have been initiated by nearly every modern intelligence service, although most deny the use of sexual trapping.

The author Henry R. Schlesinger writes in his new book Honey Trapped: Sex, Betrayal, “Like a denounced small-town brothel by citizens that nonetheless maintains a lively Saturday night business, sex in the world of espionage takes a different place.” keeps. and armed love.

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‘Organizations that reluctantly accept spy satellites, covert payments and covert audio surveillance display a persistent satire around the profession’s oldest and arguably one of its most effective tactics.’

Starting with Samson and Delilah, Schlesinger recounts well-known and lesser-known cases of suspected and confirmed honey trap operations, including the most famous femme fatale in history: Mata Hari.

Here, FEMAIL reveals some of the tantric cases uncovered by the author…

15th-century Venetian officer betrayed by his mistress

Caught in the bedroom: In 1498, Venetian official Antonio Di Lando shared government secrets with his mistress, who had hidden her other lover under the bed. painted, Venetian lover, painted 1525-1530

From Control to Exploitation: How the Honey Trap Works – and the Four Main Types

While honey traps appear spontaneous, they are controlled just like any other operation. Goals are observed, evaluated, recruited and handled. There are also subtle differences in what they are designed to achieve. Schlesinger writes:

Control: Obtaining a person’s cooperation for human intelligence tasks, such as passing secrets over an extended period for access to love or sex.

Exploitation, taking unfair advantage: Revealing secrets either unintentionally or unintentionally by talking on pillows, through access to computers, phones, or other equipment containing sensitive material.

aim: Putting targets in a position that benefits adversary intelligence, such as making them vulnerable to murder or kidnapping.

To defame: Disclosure of reprehensible contact details or evidence to create a personal or organizational scam.

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The phrase ‘honey trap’ may now conjure up the image of a grainy hotel room photograph taken on a hidden camera, or sneak covert video recordings, but it existed centuries before the invention of modern technology.

Schlesinger refers to a simple but effective honey trap operation that involved Antonio di Lando, a low-level official in 15th-century Venice, who was executed after being betrayed by his mistress.

In 1498, Di Lando, 70, who had been tasked with decryption and other sensitive matters for the government, shared confidential information during a passionate night in bed with his lover, Laura Troiolo.

He didn’t know that Troyolo had hidden another lover, Hironimo Amai, under the bed in order to catch Di Lando sharing his secrets.

Amai listens to the couple as Troyolo prompts them to talk about their work during a pillow talk.

His companion then reported what he had heard to the Council of Ten, Venice’s shadowy and powerful governing body.

Created in 1310, the Council of Ten was a special tribunal tasked with preventing conspiracies and crimes against the state.

The three members acted as state inquisitors and investigated all criminal, moral, religious and political crimes through the secret police.

It is not known what information Di Lando shared, but it was enough for him to be sentenced to death.

The Council of Ten had Di Lando hanged and publicly displayed his body to set an example for other loose-knit officials.

Catherine de Medici’s band of women to woo European royals

Head of Honey Trap Ring?  Catherine de Medici, wife of King Henry II of France, and Francis II, mother of Charles IX and Henry III, were asked to oversee a group of women called the Flying Squadron, who were sent to leaders as intelligence personnel. had gone.  Although it is unlikely that this group existed, it is believed to have been involved in similar plans.

Head of Honey Trap Ring? Catherine de Medici, wife of King Henry II of France, and Francis II, mother of Charles IX and Henry III, were asked to oversee a group of women called the Flying Squadron, who were sent to leaders as intelligence personnel. had gone. Although it is unlikely that this group existed, it is believed to have been involved in similar plans.

In another example, Catherine called the talents of the Baroness of Sauvé, Charlotte de Beaune Cemblancé, who was allegedly taught sexual techniques by prostitutes, was portrayed to seduce her son Francis, Duke of Alençon.

and his son-in-law, King Henry of Navarre

In another example, Catherine invokes the talents of the Baroness of Sauvé, Charlotte de Beaune Cemblanke, who was allegedly taught sexual techniques by prostitutes, to seduce her son Francis, Duke of Alençon (left) and her son-in-law. For. Law, King Henry of Navarre

Catherine de Medici, wife of King Henry II of France, and mother of kings Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III, was rumored to have overseen a group of women called the Flying Squadron, who were called leaders as agents of influence and intelligence operators. Was sent.

Schlesinger writes, ‘acting as sexually traumatized soldiers, each one was beautiful, refined and well educated in the ‘art of love’, and each was very carefully selected for its particular mission.

Europe’s ‘Serpent Queen’: the dark and scandalous life of Catherine de Medici

Born in Florence on 13 April 1519, but orphaned a month later, Catherine was only 14 when her uncle Pope Clement VII arranged for her to marry the Duke of Orléans, the second son of the King of France.

Due to the unexpected death of her older brother, her husband ascended the throne in 1547, as a result of which Catherine became Queen of France.

However, he had a loveless …

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