Thrifty student, 18, who ‘didn’t want to be seen twice in the same outfit’ reveals how she saves HUNDREDS by buying from charity shops where she snaps up Dior and Burberry pieces for as little as £40

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  • Hope Bailey, of Manchester, used to be ashamed of ‘stinky’ charity shops
  • 18-year-old advertising student didn’t want to be seen in the same outfit twice
  • She started shopping in charity shops to save money and now saves hundreds
  • The Fashion Addict has got designer deals from Mulberry, Dior and Coach

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A fashion influencer who used to be ’embarrassed’ to appear in charity shops has revealed how she saves up to £150 per shopping trip on designer buys.

Hope Bailey, 18, of Castlefield, Manchester, began shopping regularly at charity shops and car boot sales three years ago when she wanted to expand her wardrobe without breaking the bank.

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After snatching up old Burberry & Coach bags and purses, a Dior T-shirt and Mulberry belt for a fraction of the original price, she now almost exclusively buys secondhand—and the best way to break out the ‘secondhand taboo’. Hoping to show off her hobby. .

Despite feeling embarrassed going to a secondhand store with her mother as a child, Hope now accepts the bargains she bags and insists that charity shops are not the ‘stinky’ places they are What people think

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Hope Bailey, 18, of Castlefield, Manchester, began shopping regularly at charity shops and car boot sales three years ago

Hope said: ‘When I was in high school I used to buy eight things from an online fast fashion business for around £200 and now I can get 50 things for £40 from charity shops, so I can save hundreds. I am Month.

‘I’m very passionate about my outfit so I buy a lot but it might be cheaper for other people.

‘I won’t be able to meet or afford my demand for new clothes and clothes on the websites everyone else shop on.

‘It allowed me to be more comfortable and spend more days as a student in Manchester.’

The advertising and brand communications student now hopes to break the stigma surrounding charity shops and encourage more people to shop there instead of fast fashion brands.

She reveals how she saves up to £150 per shopping trip on designer purchases

She reveals how she saves up to £150 per shopping trip on designer purchases

She snags vintage Burberry & Coach bags and purses, a Dior T-shirt and Mulberry belt for a fraction of the original price and now almost exclusively buys secondhand

She snags vintage Burberry & Coach bags and purses, a Dior T-shirt and Mulberry belt for a fraction of the original price and now almost exclusively buys secondhand

She’s gotten one online after sharing her frugal finds and using her platform to inspire others to use the store to help the environment and raise money for a good cause while developing her own unique style. does.

Swapping fast fashion for vintage also means that Hope can buy more clothes while spending less and extend the life of worn clothing, which might otherwise end up headed to a landfill.

In response to claims that she is going to ‘buy’ other stores that people in low-income households may need, Kishor insists that donations going to landfills if anyone buys them. Stores get ‘overwhelmed’.

As a child, she has admitted to feeling ashamed of going to a second hand store with her mother.

As a child, she has admitted to feeling ashamed of going to a second hand store with her mother.

Asha now accepts the bargains she bags and insists that charity shops are not the 'stinky' places people think

Asha now accepts the bargains she bags and insists that charity shops are not the ‘stinky’ places people think

Advertising and brand communication students now hope to break the stigma surrounding charity shops

Advertising and brand communication students now hope to break the stigma surrounding charity shops

Hope said: ‘I got into it at first because I didn’t want to wear the same outfit twice when I started going into sixth form and you could wear your clothes.

‘I wanted to stand out and not wear the same things as everyone else, so the only option that was cheaper was charity shops.

‘Shopping at charitable stores made me more into sustainable shopping and realized just how bad the fast fashion industry is.

Teens visit charity shops every other day and car boot sales twice a month to maintain a stylish daily appearance with various, unique outfits.

Teens visit charity shops every other day and car boot sales twice a month to maintain a stylish daily appearance with various, unique outfits.

Despite the taboo against shopping on the other hand, Hope explains that it's the same thing as buying an item from the depot, which most people find more acceptable.

Despite the taboo against shopping on the other hand, Hope explains that it’s the same thing as buying an item from the depot, which most people find more acceptable.

‘A lot of my clothes are from charity shops, very rarely I will shop in fast fashion brands unless I need underwear and pajamas.

‘People are surprised when I tell them I shop at charity shops – a lot of girls message me on Instagram asking me to send links to the clothes I’m wearing and I’m sorry’ That I don’t have the link it’s from a charity shop.

‘I’ve made some comments on TikTok saying I’m going to buy the stores, but if you go to their storeroom you’ll see they’re just overwhelmed with donations and if that happens they have to send it to the landfill Will happen. ‘Do not sell.’

Teens visit charity shops every other day and car boot sales twice a month to maintain a stylish daily appearance with various, unique outfits.

She says that not only can you find good quality vintage clothing items in charity shops, but large retailers including Pretty Little Thing and Zara also donate directly to the stores, which means they often sell brand new items as well. are packaged together.

Despite the taboo against second-hand purchases, Hope explains that it’s the same thing as buying an item from Depop, which most people find more acceptable.

Once she puts on a dress and wears nothing again, the fashionable schoolgirl gives clothes and accessories to her friends or donates them again so that nothing goes to waste.

Hope said: ‘When I was younger I would sometimes go to her mother with her, but it is such a taboo thing I used to feel very ashamed of and if I knew anyone I would run away quickly Hope they don’t see me.

‘It’s something to be proud of not buying second hand, but there seems to be a big difference between Depop and charity shops – more people will shop at Depop than charity shops and it doesn’t make sense because It’s the same thing.

‘I think a lot of people still have the notion of charity shops from 20 years ago, especially the older generation because my aunt always says ‘I don’t understand how you get into them’.

Once she puts on a dress and wears nothing again, the fashionable schoolgirl gives clothes and accessories to her friends or donates them again so that nothing goes to waste

Once she has put on a dress and…

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