Trainee paramedic reveals she cared for just ONE patient in 14.5 HOUR shift because her ambulance crew was stuck outside hospital for ENTIRE time waiting to handover to A&E team

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  • Southwest Ambulance Service workers said they were ‘stuck in the hospital’
  • Calls to 999 hit a record 1.3 million last month, an increase of 273,025 compared to 2020
  • 75% of these additional calls are from patients who are eagerly waiting for an ambulance
  • A&E. Ambulance delays attributed to patients spending ‘too long’ in

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Faye Shepherd (pictured), who is on appointment at South Western Ambulance Service, warned about delays in handovers

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A trainee paramedic has revealed how he treated just one patient during a 14-and-a-half hour shift, an example that shows the scale of the NHS crisis.

Faye Shepherd said she spent the entire shift on Monday caring for the patient in the back of an ambulance while waiting for the bed at A&E to be cleared.

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Upon appointment to the South Western Ambulance Service, the student warned that ‘people are dying waiting for ambulances’ due to delays in handovers.

She also pointed out that in a separate incident last month, her ambulance was ranked 23rd in a queue of 25 vehicles waiting to drop off patients at the emergency department.

More than 1.3 million emergency calls were made in England in October – up from 273,025 in the same period last year, the latest figures show.

In a single month, more than 7,000 patients waited for more than 12 hours to be seen at A&E in October – more than triple the pre-Covid number in a single month.

Unprecedented demand, coupled with worsening handover delays, have left heart attack and stroke patients waiting for an ambulance for nearly an hour.

Paramedic bosses have said that crews are currently seeing two to three patients on a shift, while they typically get up to eight.

This came as the South East Coast Ambulance Service declared a ‘serious incident’ due to a ‘critical’ IT issue, and urged patients to avoid calling 999 where possible.

Ms Shepherd posted this photo after her shift on Monday night, saying she had only helped one patient because of the queues outside the hospital.

Ms Shepherd posted this photo after her shift on Monday night, saying she had only helped one patient because of the queues outside the hospital.

A record 999 calls were made to England in October, with 1,012,143 calling for immediate medical help.  But the time taken to answer these calls also increased to a record 56 seconds.

A record 999 calls were made to England in October, with 1,012,143 calling for immediate medical help. But the time taken to answer these calls also increased to a record 56 seconds.

The NHS has long struggled to meet its recommended ambulance response times for Category 2 incidents, which include medical emergencies such as stroke and severe burns, but after calling 999 over the past few months, the number of ambulances An unprecedented increase has been observed with patients waiting for an average of about an hour for

The NHS has long struggled to meet its recommended ambulance response times for Category 2 incidents, which include medical emergencies such as stroke and severe burns, but after calling 999 over the past few months, the number of ambulances An unprecedented increase has been observed with patients waiting for an average of about an hour for

Ms Shepherd wrote on Twitter yesterday morning: ‘During the 14.5 hour shift last night, we saw a patient.

‘Not because there is no demand, but because we stayed in the hospital for the entire duration, waiting for a bed space.

Meanwhile, people are dying waiting for the ambulance. what part of it is durable [Health Secretary] Sajid Javid?’

She continued: ‘We were not able to hand over our patient to the hospital before our shift was over, so one day the crew went to the hospital and picked up our patient, who dropped us on our way home.’

It came as an NHS official admitted yesterday that there are hundreds of thousands of 999 calls every month from desperate people asking where their ambulance is.

70-year-old father dies of suspected heart attack after waiting 70 minutes for ambulance

A 70-year-old father died of a suspected heart attack after waiting an hour and 10 minutes for an ambulance.

The man from south east London, who has not been named, first called 999 and then alerted his two daughters.

One daughter, Emma, ​​not her real name, moved from her home to her home two miles away.

He made repeated frantic calls to 999 for an ambulance, but was told would arrive ‘within 41 minutes’.

An hour after the first call, the man stopped breathing and Emma had to give him CPR.

An ambulance finally arrived 69 minutes after the first call.

His daughter Jane, who is not his real name, who is in his 30s, said: ‘It is the emotional trauma of watching and desperately trying to save his life, knowing that he was seriously depressed. , It’s heavy.

‘ Her last words to (Emma) were ‘this is the most excruciating pain I’ve ever had’ and she has to live with it now.

‘Nothing will bring him back but we will do everything possible to ensure that no one else loses his life unnecessarily and no one goes through this trauma.’

Ambulances in England aim to respond to Category 2 calls such as stroke and heart attack within 18 minutes, and reach 90 percent of all calls within 40 minutes.

But the latest figures from October show that ambulances are taking 53 minutes 54 seconds, or nearly three times as long, to reach patients.

A London Ambulance Service spokesperson said: ‘Our thoughts are with the patient’s family and friends at this difficult time and we send them our deepest condolences.

‘We are looking at how we responded to the patient, and would encourage the family to reach out to our patient experience team so that we can support them in reviewing what happened.’

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More than 1.3 million calls were made in October – a record – but in three quarters repeat callers pleaded for updates on the arrival of their ambulances.

There are reports of patients dying in hospital car parks and behind ambulances in NHS corridors as handovers are delayed.

NHS England boss Amanda Pritchard has said patients are spending ‘too long time at A&E’ but cannot be discharged because of an overly social care system.

It warned last month that there was a “sense of concern” among employees due to the delay.

NHS data for October shows the average wait time for some 999 emergency ambulance calls has reached 54 minutes.

This is triple the 18-minute target of ambulance trusts to answer these ‘category 2’ calls, which include stroke and heart attack.

Speaking at the NHS Providers Annual Conference yesterday, Chris Hopson, the organisation’s chief executive, said: ‘We think …

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