Trump wants to REMOVE Mitch McConnell after the GOP leader disputed election fraud claims – but few Republicans are willing to join him 

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  • Former President Trump reportedly talks with aides in the Senate about ousting Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell
  • Even supporters of the former president gave him the least scathing reactions.
  • One GOP senator compared Trump’s success to an asshole learning to fly
  • Trump did not say whether he was personally excluding primary challengers

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Former President Donald Trump is seeking a primary challenge to end the political career of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, reports surfaced Monday.

People familiar with the conversation reported that Trump has been busy calling allies and other supporters in the Senate to find out whether he too thinks it is time for a leadership change. wall street journal.

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But lawmakers and their allies say there is clearly little interest in finding a Kentucky Republican to run against McConnell.

However, he said the talks were also likely to deepen the divide between the two Republican leaders – one a ruling establishment with more than three decades in the Senate, the other a former president who still wielded influence over the party. Is.

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DailyMail.com has reached out to McConnell’s campaign for comment.

Trump would not tell the Wall Street Journal whether he was personally fielding a potential challenger.

But he said Senate Republicans should oust him themselves.

Trump said, ‘I think he is very bad for the Republican Party.

Trump is reportedly calling on Senate lawmakers and aides to see if anyone is interested in ousting McConnell

Former President Trump is reportedly looking for someone to challenge the primary against Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, though he himself denied personally scouting for candidates.

And as President Joe Biden’s approval ratings continue to plummet, the GOP is looking for a way forward to seize on Democrats’ weaknesses.

In Congress, it appears Trump’s aides are also walking the party line for now.

Senator Tommy Tuberville of Alabama, who was endorsed and applauded by Trump, has shied away from defending the former president.

“I’m not going to get into that fight, McConnell is doing a good job,” Tuberville told the Wall Street Journal.

Senator John Kennedy of Louisiana, who is also a supporter of Trump, told the outlet that the chances of Trump ousting McConnell are close to an ass fly.

Kennedy said, ‘I really don’t see that happening.

It is the latest shot taken at the Trump-McConnell rift, which has only escalated since the former president was defeated in November.

McConnell is a political insider, the 16th longest-serving senator in history, according to data from the Senate website, the highest-ranking Republican in elected office.

Senator Tommy Tuberville of Alabama, a staunch Trump ally, when asked which side he was on, said McConnell was doing a 'good job'.

Senator Tommy Tuberville of Alabama, a staunch Trump ally, when asked which side he was on, said McConnell was doing a ‘good job’.

Louisiana Senator John Kennedy said Trump's chances of ousting McConnell were closer to an ass that was learning to fly

Louisiana Senator John Kennedy said Trump’s chances of ousting McConnell were closer to an ass that was learning to fly

He has led the Senate GOP since being elected minority leader in 2006.

McConnell supported Trump for most of his term, but drew a line with the former president’s efforts to reverse the election.

Speaking on the Senate floor on January 6 before the election certification vote, McConnell said lawmakers had a duty to uphold the will of the people and dismissed the former president’s claims that the race was rigged.

McConnell had said, “It would be unfair and wrong to deny American voters the right to vote and to dismiss the courts and states on that ground.”

Later that day, as violent Trump supporters stormed the Capitol, McConnell delivered a scathing rebuke in which he held the former president “morally responsible” for the riots.

However, when it came time to vote on impeachment over the attack, McConnell said the Senate did not have the jurisdiction to remove a former president from office.

The two have also disagreed on policy matters.

McConnell said Trump was ‘morally responsible’ for the January 6 Capitol riot, although he declined to vote for impeachment after leaving office

McConnell was one of 19 Republicans who voted in favor of a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill.

He later shrugged off criticism from Trump and fellow Republicans who accused McConnell of leading Democrats to victory in the 2022 midterm.

The Kentucky lawmaker said infrastructure was “popular” on both sides of the aisle.

Shortly before the vote, Trump issued a scathing statement directed at McConnell.

‘No one will ever understand why Mitch McConnell allowed this non-infrastructure bill to pass. They have left all their leverage for the big Hopper of a bill,’ he said, referring to the Democrat-backed $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation bill, which is also working through Congress.

‘He’s been working so hard to get Biden to win, now he’ll go for the big one, including the biggest tax hike in our nation’s history.’

But as the election cycle draws on, the GOP is already seeing escalating feuds between pro-Trump candidates and establishment Republicans.

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