US Nurses Leaving Hospital Bedsides  

- Advertisement -


“I couldn’t understand how this highly educated, powerful trauma nurse is patient now.”

- Advertisement -

A registered nurse who asks if we call her “Gee” is talking about herself. While working in the emergency room of her community hospital at the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, Gi fainted, crying, unable to speak or work. She was having panic attacks and was later hospitalized in an inpatient psychiatric facility diagnosed with PTSD. Gi is now back near a hospital bed – as a hospice nurse.

Epidemic of suffering nurses

advertisement

Gee is not alone. The number of nurses with mental health problems has increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic. a Survey by the International Council of Nurses (ICN) shows that the number of nurses reporting mental health issues has increased from 60% to 80% in several countries since the pandemic began.

“Nurses are suffering,” says ICN CEO Howard Catton. He cites the violent attacks, “along with the exhaustion, grief, and fear faced by nurses caring for patients.”

- Advertisement -

NS American Nurses Foundation 1 in 3 nurses report that they are “emotionally unwell.”





please wait






embed





US nurses in crisis are leaving hospitals





No media sources currently available






0:00

0:03:31












0:00






















‘Normal order is crumbling’

Nurses say that mental health stress stems from a variety of issues. The industry was already facing staff shortages before COVID-19, and many nurses took on a number of jobs to care for the growing number of patients. Now the recommended ratio of 1 nurse to 2 patients is increased to a ratio of 1 to 3 for the detriment of patients and nurses alike.

“Clara,” who has spent her career as a nurse, says she is “with tremendous workloads, enormous amounts, with not enough resources.” One wrong move can make the difference between life and death – and potentially ruin a career.

“It’s constant pressure on your shoulders, constant downward pressure, you have to go faster, you have to do better, you have to work harder,” she said.

Alex Kaspin quit his emergency room job for a less stressful nursing position on the pediatric floor.  His stress led to panic disorder.  (Caroline Presutti/VOA)

Alex Kaspin quit his emergency room job for a less stressful nursing position on the pediatric floor. His stress led to panic disorder. (Caroline Presutti/Granthshala)

Alex Caspin suffered from panic disorder due to overwork, being overworked and overwhelmed. She recently stepped away from a Philadelphia emergency room when COVID-19 numbers were matched by the city’s rising murder rate.

“At that time,” Kaspin says, “all normal systems were breaking down.” Kaspin says his hospital was operating in a “triage state.” She did not have enough nurses to take care of the patients in the regular rooms. So the emergency room was filled with patients, and the waiting room became the emergency room.

Philadelphia Police Officer Sean Wills investigates a double shootout.  The city's murder rate has added to the COVID-19 stress for emergency room nurses.  (Caroline Presutti/VOA)

Philadelphia Police Officer Sean Wills investigates a double shootout. The city’s murder rate has added to the COVID-19 stress for emergency room nurses. (Caroline Presutti/Granthshala)

‘Please give me the vaccine now’

Amid escalating violence in the United States and a rise in COVID-19 patients, Kaspin realized that she could not deliver health care to the standards she set for herself. Adding to the stress was the patients’ immunity against COVID-19.

She is surrounded by memories of several COVID-19 patients in their 20s. “Just before we put the windpipe down, they say the last thing. ‘I need the vaccine now. Please give me the vaccine now.’ ,

Pennsylvanian Jane Partyca Tika calls hesitation to deliberate ignorance she has never seen in her 27 years of nursing.

“You are deliberately creating a situation that I, as a nurse manager, cannot tolerate,” says Partyka. She will always do her best for her patients, she says, but when they need to They feel differently when it turns out they haven’t been vaccinated. “You are intentionally harming others.”

COVID-19 burnout is prompting US nurses to quit, leaving patients at risk





please wait






embed





COVID-19 burnout is prompting US nurses to quit, leaving patients at risk





No media sources currently available






0:00

0:03:41












0:00






















Experts say that getting more people vaccinated will reduce the number of patients significantly.

Chip is the President and CEO of Kan Federation of American Hospitals, He says there is no “short-term, magic bullet” but “less COVID” is needed.

No more steaming pots of support

Abigail Donnelly worked in the Manhattan ICU during the early stages of the pandemic. He quit his job to co-founder impact in healthcare To work to change policies for the benefit of workers and patients. Impact’s December campaign promotes safe staffing levels.

Donnelly says nurses were once seen as COVID-19 heroes. “People were banging dishes for him at seven o’clock, but now he’s not getting his salary,” Donnelly said on Skype. “They can’t get a bonus. They can’t get child care. They don’t have maternal health care.”

An increasing number of nurses are leaving hospital beds for less hard work and better pay. Travel nursing agencies send nurses where they are needed to prevent dwindling staffing numbers, offering up to three times the pay other nurses receive.

“Michelle” helped set up the COVID-19 unit at the hospital, where she worked for 10 years. This month she quit her $30-an-hour registered nursing job to become a travel nurse in an intensive care unit in another city. She calls her new salary “crazy.”

“I’m leaving that system and moving into a travel nursing position, and I’ll make $120 an hour,” she told Granthshala.

Kahn says agencies are “dirtying” hospitals when they pay travel nurses so high. He agrees that it is better to have a strong, in-house team rather than temporary staffing.

When asked why hospitals don’t hire experienced nurses by offering higher salaries and other benefits, Kahn says, “There’s no way any institution can pay their broad base of nurses anywhere they want. Paying for the traveling nurses.”



- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories