US records fewer than 100,000 average daily Covid cases for the first time since August as hospitalizations drop 33% in the last month and deaths decline 12% from two weeks ago 

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  • On Thursday, the US set a seven-day rolling average of 99,893 . registered 100,083 new cases of covid with
  • This is a 33.5% drop from the 150,356 average reported a month ago and the average has dropped below 100,000 for the first time since August 5.
  • Hospitalizations have also dropped with 67,321 COVID-19 patients seeking care, a 33% drop from the record-high of 101,000 patients
  • The deaths decreased with 2,392 virus-related deaths recorded on Thursday and a seven-day rolling average of 1,803, down 19.3% from the 2,053 average fourteen days ago.
  • The growth rate of new deaths is declining and experts say deaths are a lagging indicator and often do not begin to decline until three or four weeks after cases and hospitalizations occur.
  • Former hotspot Texas has seen a 44.4% drop in cases in a month, down from 18,029 per day to 10,007 per day.
  • Georgia, another former hotspot, is reporting a 53.9% drop in the seven-day rolling average from 9,400 per day in early September to 4,332 per day on Thursday.

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Average daily COVID-19 cases in the US have fallen below 100,000 for the first time in more than two months as the fourth wave of the pandemic shows signs of further easing.

On Thursday, officials reported 100,083 new cases of the virus, with a seven-day rolling average of 99,893, data from Johns Hopkins University showed. A decrease of 33.5 percent from the rolling average of 150,356 reported four weeks ago.

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This is the lowest number since August 5, when the seven-day rolling average stood at 98,518.

Hospitalizations with 67,321 care have also fallen, a drop of 33 per cent from the 101,000 patients recorded at the same time last month. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

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On the other hand, the overall number of deaths due to Covid has increased, but the pace of new deaths continues to decline.

A total of 2,392 virus-related deaths were recorded on Thursday with a seven-day rolling average of 1,803, an increase from a month earlier but lower than the previous two weeks.

Fourteen days ago, the average was 2,053, which means the average has dropped 12.1 percent over the past two weeks.

The growth rate of new deaths is slower than the same time last week, when deaths rose 45.8 percent over the four-week period and 79.3 percent two weeks ago.

However, deaths are considered a backward indicator and often do not begin to decline until three or four weeks after cases and hospitalizations occur.

Former virus hotspots, especially states in the south like Georgia and Texas, have been seeing improvements in their metrics over the past few weeks.

Experts say they are cautiously optimistic about the latest surge in the pandemic – fueled by the delta version – tapering off, but they warned Americans not to declare victory just yet.

On Thursday, the US reported 100,083 new cases of Covid, with a seven-day rolling average of 99,893, a 33.5% drop from the 150,356 average reported a month ago and the first time the average has fallen below 100,000 since August 5.

The number of hospitalizations has also fallen with 67,321 COVID-19 patients currently seeking care, a 33% drop from the record-high of 101,000 patients.

The number of hospitalizations has also fallen with 67,321 COVID-19 patients currently seeking care, a 33% drop from the record-high of 101,000 patients.

Deaths increased with 2,392 virus-related deaths recorded on Thursday and a seven-day rolling average of 1,803, a 19.3% increase from the one-month average of 1,511, but the growth rate has slowed dramatically.

Deaths increased with 2,392 virus-related deaths recorded on Thursday and a seven-day rolling average of 1,803, a 19.3% increase from the one-month average of 1,511, but the growth rate has slowed dramatically.

William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, said, “As with almost all of my colleagues, we are smiling quietly.” CNN.

We haven’t put up the “Mission Accomplished” banner yet, but we certainly think things are getting better. New cases and hospitalizations are definitely less, and here and there, we are actually seeing a reduction in deaths.’

Public health experts believe an increase in the total number of vaccinations has helped matters and that the number of hospitalizations has dropped dramatically.

In early August, when the summer outbreak began, less than half the population was fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

As of Thursday, 56.2 percent of all US residents have completed their vaccine series, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data show.

Experts say the vaccine is fully vaccinated thanks to 56.1% of people who had completed their vaccine series when the delta surge began in August.

Experts say the vaccine is fully vaccinated thanks to 56.1% of people who had completed their vaccine series when the delta surge began in August.

Schaffner warned that the decline is not uniform across the country and that some areas are seeing sharper declines than others.

‘It’s clear that this plateau and decline – although you can see it across the country – is happening more rapidly in some parts of the country, the better vaccinated parts than other parts of the country, the less vaccinated, including mine parts. Tennessee’s own state,’ he told CNN.

‘So, although we are clearly making progress, I think we are still in two Americas.’

However, the former hotspots of the US pandemic, particularly the South. Now looking at some of the best case rates in the country.

For example, Texas, which was seeing a huge increase in infections and hospitalizations, is reporting a significant decline.

In the past month, the seven-day rolling average of cases has fallen 44.4 per cent from 18,029 per day to 10,007 per day, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

Hospitalizations are occurring across the state, including North Texas, where Dallas is located, and several Houston-area counties.

Steve Love, president and CEO of Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council, said: ‘We are moving in the right direction’ Dallas Morning News.

‘We certainly cannot declare victory because many people are still sick because of this, we have a long way to go, but we are moving in the right direction.’

Former hotspot Texas has seen a 44.4% drop in COVID-19 cases in a month, from 18,029 per day to 10,007 per day.

Former hotspot Texas has seen a 44.4% drop in COVID-19 cases in a month, from 18,029 per day to 10,007 per day.

Georgia, another former hotspot, is reporting a 53.9% drop in the seven-day rolling average from 9,400 per day in early September to 4,332 per day on Thursday.

Georgia,…

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