Where England’s fattest children live REVEALED: Almost HALF of primary school kids in parts of Birmingham are now overweight – as national data shows waistlines have shrunk slightly in past year (but you’re not allowed to call them obese anymore!)

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  • Children’s obesity levels in England have fallen compared to figures from last year when children were hit by Covid
  • But they are still very high, with one in 10 youth now obese as they enter elementary school reception.
  • And by the time they reach age 6, 23.4% are very obese, but in some parts of England this can increase to almost half.
  • Experts slammed the NHS for stopping obese children from calling ‘obese’ rather than ‘living with obesity’.

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Childhood obesity rates have declined, according to official data that showed where England’s most obese children live.

Nationally, one in 10 young people are now obese by the time they begin reception, compared to one in seven in the first year of the pandemic.

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Waist among children also shrank in year 6, with the proportion of youth in 2021/22 considered to be much fatter than one in four in 2021/22.

Experts said today that the resumption of normal life was likely to be behind the decline of Covid.

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Pediatricians partly attributed the collateral effects of lockdown restrictions to childhood obesity rates reaching a record high last year.

Like adults, children were subjected to the government’s initial rigid stay at home and were only allowed out once a day for exercise. Many people were confined to their homes even after the ban ended due to different protocols in schools. Experts warned that children may have turned to comfort food to cope with boredom and anxiety as well as lack of routine during the pandemic.

However, English children are still more obese than they were before the grip of Covid. In some parts of the country, such as the areas of London and Birmingham, nearly half of year 6 children are now overweight.

MailOnline may also reveal that NHS Digital has decided to stop calling children ‘obese’ or ‘severely obese’ who are very obese. Instead, the health service’s data body has opted to reduce its language to those who are ‘living with obesity’ or ‘living with severe obesity’.

Experts criticized the ‘clumsy politically correct terminology’ as an attempt to frame obesity as a ‘pain’ not something people can turn to.

Rates of obesity and being overweight have fallen this year after rising during the Covid pandemic, but are still higher than pre-lockdown

Among Year 6 students, the national obesity prevalence fell from 25.5 percent in 2020/21 to 23.4 percent.  But in some parts of the country, nearly half of children of this age were either obese or overweight.  The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham top the list, with 49 percent of Year 6 students being very obese.  It was followed by Sandwell in the West Midlands, just outside Birmingham, at 48.9 percent and the city of Wolverhampton at 48.6 percent.

Among Year 6 students, the national obesity prevalence fell from 25.5 percent in 2020/21 to 23.4 percent. But in some parts of the country, nearly half of children of this age were either obese or overweight. The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham top the list, with 49 percent of Year 6 students being very obese. It was followed by Sandwell in the West Midlands, just outside Birmingham, at 48.9 percent and the city of Wolverhampton at 48.6 percent.

Nationally, 10.1 percent of reception-aged children were obese during 2021/22.  But the rates were much higher in some parts of the country.  The London Borough of Westminster weighs one in four (28.9 percent) of its four- and five-year-olds were obese or overweight.  It was followed by St Helens in Merseyside and the town of Kingston upon Hull in Yorkshire, which was joint second with 28.7 percent of children.

Nationally, 10.1 percent of reception-aged children were obese during 2021/22. But the rates were much higher in some parts of the country. The London Borough of Westminster weighs one in four (28.9 percent) of its four- and five-year-olds were obese or overweight. It was followed by St Helens in Merseyside and the town of Kingston upon Hull in Yorkshire, which was joint second with 28.7 percent of children.

You are no longer allowed to call them fat! NHS criticized for using ‘politically correct’ term for obese children

NHS bosses were today criticized for using ‘politically correct’ language on obesity.

NHS Digital, which manages information and produces health statistics in England, has opted to stop classifying children as obese in its report on measurement of childhood weight in England.

Previous reports relied on the simple terms ‘obese’ or ‘severely obese’ to describe children at a certain body-mass-index.

But in the latest version, the body has opted to drop these terms and instead say that these children are either ‘living with obesity’ or ‘living with severe obesity’.

Experts today criticized the language change, saying it disguised the significant health problems of being too obese as ‘living together’.

Christopher Snowden, head of lifestyle economics at the Institute for Economic Affairs, said the language change is an example of further political correctness.

“I’ve seen more and more phrases like this over the years,” he said.

‘This is politically correct terminology designed to make obesity look like a disease, rather than something people can change.’

He said this was also incorrect and said the NHS’s use of body-mass-index as a way to determine obesity was flawed.

‘They are living a perfectly healthy weight but have been wrongly classified as obese by arbitrary and improper mathematical calculations. The actual rate of obesity in children is much lower than these figures,’ he said.

Tam Fry of the National Obesity Forum also criticized the ‘unhelpful’ language change by NHS Digital.

“It is politically correct, people are afraid of stigmatizing people,” he said.

But he added that reducing emotions shouldn’t be a priority because obesity can be framed as a condition with which people can minimize the negative health effects of ‘living’, which means having too much weight on your body. It is possible

‘It’s not helpful at all. The best approach is to stay straight ahead,’ he said.

But Katherine Jenner, director of the Obesity Health Coalition, praised the change.

“Living with obesity is in the recognition that it is a condition rather than a description, as you might say someone is living with cancer,” she said.

‘It comes from research and is meant to stigmatize less and we accept this language.’

NHS Digital was contacted for comment.

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Today’s figures are from the National Child Measurement Programme, which measured the height and weight of more than 1 million children at reception and in Year 6 in England.

In Year 6 students, the national obesity prevalence fell from 25.5 percent in 2020/21 to 23.4 percent.

Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk /

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