Your PALM could soon be your concert ticket! Amazon launches its Amazon One hand-recognition technology in music venues

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  • Concert-goers at Red Rocks near Denver can now wave their palms to enter
  • This is the first time the technology, the Amazon One, has been used outside of grocery stores.
  • But Amazon’s new biometric technology has sparked some privacy concerns

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Thanks to Amazon, your palm could soon be your ticket to a concert.

The tech giant has announced that it is bringing its palm-recognition technology, called Amazon One, to music venues as a replacement for physical tickets and apps.

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Amazon said the Red Rocks Amphitheater in Denver will be the first concert venue to test the technology, but it will be available at other locations in the coming months.

Red Rocks concertgoers can sign up to link their palm to a ticket account at Amazon One ‘enrollment stations’ outside the venue by hovering their hand on a device.

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They just need to sign up once and then they can use their palm to join other shows and events at the venue. An Amazon account is not required to use it.

However, Amazon One has already raised privacy concerns over its use of biometric data, such as facial or palm scans, as it is at risk of being stolen by hackers.

Just last month, three US senators wrote a letter to Amazon expressing concerns about the expansion of the high-tech palm print identification system.

The Amazon One palm-reading device (pictured) — already rolled out at Amazon Go grocery stores in the US — is now positioned outside the Red Rocks Amphitheater in Denver, Colorado

The Amazon One is now available on AXS's mobile ticketing pedestals, giving Red Rocks Amphitheater event goers the option to enter using just their palm.

The Amazon One is now available on AXS’s mobile ticketing pedestals, giving Red Rocks Amphitheater event-goers the option to enter using their palm.

The Red Rocks venue outside Denver, Colorado (pictured) has hosted artists including REM, Incubus, Coldplay and U2

The Red Rocks venue outside Denver, Colorado (pictured) has hosted artists including REM, Incubus, Coldplay and U2

Amazon One at Concert Venues: How It Works

When people purchase tickets for a concert on the AXS website, they are given an AXS Mobile ID, which can be accessed on the AXS app.

This AXS Mobile ID, which takes the form of a digital barcode, can be used to register your palm at Amazon One ‘enrollment stations’.

These enrollment stations can be found just before the entrance to the venue or at another enrollment station inside the venue for future programs.

People simply need to scan their AXS Mobile ID and shake hands to complete enrollment.

Enrollment takes less than a minute, and guests will have the option to enroll with just one palm or both.

They are now enrolled, and can wave their palm to go to the venue.

This process may mean that initially concert goers are queuing to complete their enrollment at enrollment stations outside the venue.

However, over time, as more and more Venues partner with Amazon One and more people have registered their hands, the time taken to get to the Venue will be greatly reduced.

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Amazon One, revealed this time last year, includes a scanner that creates a unique ‘palm signature’ when customers wave their hand in front of it.

The technology has been used so far in Amazon’s physical brick-and-mortar stores in the US, called Amazon Go, where shoppers can pay for groceries and snacks by swiping their palms.

Now, Amazon has signed a deal with entertainment company AEG to bring the technology to Red Rocks, which sells tickets on AEG’s ticket site, AXS.

This partnership is the first time Amazon One is being used outside the company’s physical stores.

AXS CEO Brian Perez said other locations have plans to add the technology in the coming months, but declined to say where or how many.

AEG partners with over 350 stadiums and theaters around the world, including the O2 Arena in east London (formerly the Millennium Dome), so it’s possible that British music lovers will be scanning their palm for entry very soon.

Perez said concertgoers can get to their seats faster with their palm than an attendant has to hold their phone to scan a bar code. Those who wish to have their palms scanned will have a separate alley to enter.

“You don’t have to mess with your phone,” Perez said. ‘Your hand is always attached to your body.’

Dilip Kumar, vice president of physical retail and technology at Amazon, described the technology: blog post.

“As we approach the first anniversary of the launch of the Amazon One later this month, I am excited to share that it is now available as an option to enter the Red Rocks Amphitheater in Denver, Colorado. ,” They said.

‘We are excited about the potential for expansion to other locations where entry lines can be lengthy and time-consuming.’

To address privacy concerns, Amazon said it keeps Palm images in a secure part of its cloud and does not store the information on Amazon One palm-scanner devices.

According to the tech giant, users can ask for their information to be deleted at any time.

Last year, when the Amazon One was revealed, Kumar had said that the company chose face-to-palm recognition as it is more secure.

Would you give your palm readings to Amazon?  Privacy experts have warned against companies using biometric data, such as face or palm scans, as it is at risk of being hacked and stolen.

Would you give your palm readings to Amazon? Privacy experts have warned against companies using biometric data, such as face or palm scans, as it is at risk of being hacked and stolen.

Amazon creates a unique 'palm signature' for each person using an Amazon One device located at the entrance to its Amazon Go grocery store

Amazon creates a unique ‘palm signature’ for each person using an Amazon One device located at the entrance to its Amazon Go grocery store

“One of the reasons why palm recognition is considered more private than some biometric options is because you can’t identify a person by looking at an image of their palm,” he said.

‘It also requires someone to make a deliberate gesture by holding their palm on the device in order to use it.

‘And it’s contactless, which we think customers will appreciate, especially in the current times. Ultimately, using the palm as a biometric identifier allows customers to control when and where they access the service.’

Last month, three US senators – Democrats Amy Klobuchar and John Ossoff and Republican Bill Cassidy – wrote a letter to Amazon expressing their concerns about Amazon One.

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